Medindia
Advertisement

Researchers Unveil Mechanism of How Brain Balances Hearing Between the Ears

by Shirley Johanna on May 14, 2015 at 11:57 AM
Font : A-A+

 Researchers Unveil Mechanism of How Brain Balances Hearing Between the Ears

The biological process of how the brain balances the hearing between two ears is revealed. The balance is essential to localize sound and hear in noisy conditions and for protection from noise damage.

A team from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) sought to understand the biological process behind the 'olivocochlear' hearing control reflex.

Advertisement

"The balance of hearing between the ears is dependent upon this neural reflex that links the cochlea of each ear via the brain's auditory control center," explained senior researcher Gary Housley.

Our hearing is so sensitive that we can hear a pin drop and that is because of the "cochlear amplifier" in our inner ear. This stems from outer hair cells in the cochlea which amplify sound vibrations.
Advertisement

In animal experiments, the team found that the cochlear's outer hair cells, which amplify sound vibrations, also provide the sensory signal to the brain via a small group of auditory nerve fibers of previously unknown function.

In mice lacking the sensory fiber connection to the cochlear outer hair cells, loud sound presented to one ear had no effect on hearing sensitivity in the other ear.

In normal mice, this produced an almost instant suppression of hearing. The researchers speculate that some of the hearing loss that humans experience as they age may be related to the gradual breakdown of this sensory fiber connection to the outer hair cells.

The ultimate goal is for cochlear implants in both ears to communicate with each other so that the brain can receive the most accurate soundscape possible.

The research is published in the Journal Nature Communications

Source: Medindia
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
World Alzheimer's Day 2021 - 'Know Dementia, Know Alzheimer's
'Hybrid Immunity' may Help Elude COVID-19 Pandemic
Stroop Effect
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Parkinsons Disease Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Brain Brain Facts Ataxia Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) 

Recommended Reading
Single Side Deafness in India Being Treated with 'Bone Anchored Hearing Aid'
With close to 200,000 new cases of single side deafness being diagnosed in India every year, you ......
Research Points to Potential Way to Restore Hearing
There's a cast of characters deep inside your ears -- many types of tiny cells are working together ...
In Kids With Hearing Implants, Slowed Language Development Doesn't Predict Bad Behavior
At The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, researchers conducted a longitudinal study of .....
New Study Identifies the Hearing Requirements of British Soldiers
With assistance from the Ministry of Defence, University of Southampton researchers have conducted ....
Ataxia
Ataxia affects coordination. Gait becomes unstable and the patient loses balance. The cerebellum or ...
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, writte...
Parkinsons Disease
Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive dopamine brain cells loss. ...
Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ)
Intelligence quotient (IQ) is a psychological measure of human intelligence. Regular physical and me...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use