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No Virus Vaccine To Babies Of Mothers Who Take Crohn’s Disease Drug Adalimumab

by Gopalan on May 8, 2011 at 8:34 AM
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 No Virus Vaccine To Babies Of Mothers Who Take Crohn’s Disease Drug Adalimumab

The obstetricians are being warned of the problems involved in prescribing pregnant women the Crohn's disease drug Adalimumab (ADA). The drug actively crosses the placenta during the final trimester of pregnancy and remains in a newborn's bloodstream for at least three months.

The ADA is known to decrease the immune system's ability to fight infection. Hence infants exposed in utero should be monitored closely for infection in the first six months of life and should not receive any live-virus vaccines during that time, cautioned University of California San Francisco researchers.

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"Since there is some placental transfer of adalimumab before birth, you have to be vigilant in the first six months of life for the baby," said lead author Uma Mahadevan, MD. Dr. Mahadevan. She is an associate professor of medicine. "However, our findings do not suggest that a pregnant woman should discontinue the drug. Stopping it actually can be more harmful to both baby and mother because of the risk of miscarriage, preterm birth and low birth weight if the Crohn's disease flares."

The study followed five pregnant women with Crohn's disease who were taking ADA. On the day of delivery, ADA levels were measured in the mother, newborn and cord blood. In all cases, the cord blood showed higher levels than the maternal levels — indicating transfer from the mother — and significant ADA levels were found in three of the newborn samples. Levels continued to be checked in the infants until ADA could no longer be identified.
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"At a minimum, it can be detected to three months from birth," Dr. Mahadevan noted.

Dr. Mahadevan said future studies should explore the effects of medications during children's initial years as well as potential risks later in life because of their exposure in utero.

Dr. Mahadevan will present these data on Saturday at the Digestive Disease Week®, an largest international gathering of physicians, researchers and academics in the fields of gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery. I is jointly sponsored by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, the AGA Institute, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract and will showcases more than 5,000 abstracts and hundreds of lectures on the latest advances in GI research, medicine and technology.



Source: Medindia
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