About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Nicotinic Receptor Makes People Biologically Susceptible to Drug Addiction

by VR Sreeraman on August 16, 2007 at 7:13 PM
Font : A-A+

Nicotinic Receptor Makes People Biologically Susceptible to Drug Addiction

Results of a new study on rats may help explain why some people are biologically more susceptible to drug addiction than the others.

Researchers at the University of Chicago has discovered that rats most likely to self-administer addictive drugs had a particular receptor in the brain that is more responsive than the same receptor in rats least likely to self-administer addictive drugs.

Advertisement

This receptor, known as the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), increases excitability within in the brain's reward centres. In the animals that were more likely to take addictive drugs, the effects of these receptors were much stronger, leading to more profound excitation of the cells and pathways associated with reward.

"Stress, and the associated increases in stress hormones, will promote drug-taking behaviour regardless of whether an animal is more or less susceptible," said the researchers.
Advertisement

They showed that stress also increases the responses of nAChRs within the brain's reward areas.

"We tested the exploratory behaviour of rats in an unfamiliar cage. Rats that explore a new environment for a prolonged period of time were more interested in addictive drugs," said Daniel McGehee, PhD, associate professor and lead researcher on this study.

"Those rats also had stronger nAChR responses, meaning their brains responded differently to the drugs. We measured receptor activity in the brain's reward centres that are known to be activated by addictive drugs."

"This study provides valuable insight into the mechanism of addiction. It raises the possibility that nicotinic receptors may be important targets for the treatment of multiple addictions, not just nicotine. Unfortunately, blocking these receptors may also interfere with healthy behaviours that depend upon the same brain circuitry. Precisely where these findings will lead drug treatment strategies is unclear, but this work provides insight into the role of nicotinic receptors in the vulnerability to multiple classes of addictive drugs," said McGehee.

The study is published in the August 15, 2007 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Source: ANI
LIN/J
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Memory Loss - Can it be Recovered?
International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2021 - Fighting for Rights in the Post-COVID Era
Effect of Blood Group Type on COVID-19 Risk and Severity
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Drug Toxicity Cannabis Signature Drug Toxicity 

Recommended Reading
Drug Abuse
The use of Drugs for reasons other than its prescribed recommendation, is known as Drug abuse or ......
20 Mg Rimonabant Per Day may Help to Quit Smoking
Using rimonabant at a dose of 20 mg per day can help people quit smoking, can help them to remain .....
Sugar-The Key That Unleashes A Smoker's High
A study from the University of Southern California suggests that sugar has a major role to play in ....
Cannabis
Cannabis has a long history of medicinal, recreational, and industrial use and comes from a bushy pl...
Drug Toxicity
Drug toxicity is an adverse reaction of the body towards a drug that results as a side effect of a d...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use