New Treatment for People with Ebola

by Hannah Joy on  September 27, 2017 at 11:30 AM Research News
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Ebola virus surprisingly uses the body's natural defenses like the immune system to speed the rate of infection that could lead to death eventually. The virus affects T-cells through Tim-1 protein binding and blocking the protein with a drug can reduce the severity of the disease, reveals a new study.
New Treatment for People with Ebola
New Treatment for People with Ebola

The study was conducted in collaboration with the University of Washington and The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and scientists from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have published the findings in mBio.

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When someone is infected with the Ebola virus, part of the reason that the resulting disease is so severe is because the virus causes parts of the immune system to malfunction.

T-cells, which are a specialized type of white blood cells that seek and destroy virus-infected cells, are particularly vulnerable to the Ebola virus.

"In this study, we demonstrated the central role of a T-cell protein called Tim-1 in the development of Ebola virus disease," said senior author Alexander Bukreyev, a UTMB virologist in the departments of pathology and microbiology and immunology.

"Mice that were genetically engineered without Tim-1 became less ill when infected with Ebola virus and only one died, whereas all of the unmodified mice succumbed."

Bukreyev noted that the mice without Tim-1 had only slightly lower levels of the virus in their bodies compared with unmodified mice, suggesting that the Ebola virus needs the Tim-1 cells to spread infection.

The Tim-1 deficient mice's immune system used a different virus-fighting strategy that protected them.

A series of biological analyses of the mice with Tim-1 and immune cells isolated from human donors showed that Ebola virus directly binds to T-cells through Tim-1 protein binding and causes massive inflammation that thwarts the immune system.

The severity of inflammatory immune reaction is consistently linked with the intensity of the disease and risk of death from Ebola.

"Understanding how the invading Ebola virus impacts the host's immune system is a very important step in developing targeted therapies for Ebola virus disease," said Bukreyev.

"The findings of this study indicate that drugs that block Tim-1 could be a potential new treatment for people with Ebola." "If we can find a way to limit the inflammatory response known as the 'cytokine storm' during Ebola infection, we can potentially improve disease outcome" said Patrick Younan, the lead author of the paper.

"Controlling and successfully balancing the immune response following Ebola virus infection is greatly important for reducing symptoms and fatal outcomes," said Mathieu Iampietro, the co-lead author of the paper.



Source: Eurekalert

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