Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Medindia
Advertisement

Naturally Occurring Steroids Encourage Fat Buildup in Body

by Kathy Jones on September 23, 2012 at 8:03 PM
 Naturally Occurring Steroids Encourage Fat Buildup in Body

A new study published in the journal Chemistry & Biology reveals that the buildup of fat in the body could be encouraged by naturally occurring steroids called glucocorticoids which interfere in the workings of cellular proteins called androgen receptors that are vital for blocking fat accumulation.

"This has implications in this era of an obesity epidemic," says senior author Dr. Michael Mancini, from Baylor College of Medicine. "If you can reduce glucocorticoids, you might be able to upregulate, or increase, androgen receptor activity and regulate fat storage."

Advertisement

The discovery came after Dr. Mancini and his team searched for genes or signals expressed specifically by human fat cells with the hope of gaining a better understanding of fat deposition and the development of obesity. They used a novel approach that combined gene expression studies with automated microscopy and specialized image analyses.

The approach showed that the androgen receptor is both expressed and functional during the early stages of fat cell differentiation. "Activation of the androgen receptor can inhibit the early stages of human fat maturation," says first author Dr. Sean Hartig, also from Baylor College of Medicine. The finding makes sense because androgens such as testosterone, which bind to androgen receptors, are known to favorably direct muscle differentiation, regulate muscle mass, and increase lean body mass as humans age.
Advertisement

The researchers also found that glucocorticoids decrease androgen receptor activity and alter the effects of androgens on fat storage. The result is deposition of fat throughout the body, particularly in the abdominal region. "Using a custom-developed image analysis software platform usually found only in large pharmaceutical screening centers, we applied specific algorithms to sensitively detect the glucocorticoid inhibition of androgen receptor activity," says Dr. Mancini.

The research suggests that treatment strategies that modulate the activity of glucocorticoids and the androgen receptor—perhaps in combination—may help combat obesity.



Source: Eurekalert
Font : A-A+

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Readings

Latest Obesity News

How Exercise Improves Obesity-Linked Dementia?
Regular exercise in obese individuals lowers memory loss and cognitive impairment, preventing neurodegenerative disorders including dementia.
Obesity Linked to Poorer Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare Symptoms
Clinicians should take into account patients' BMI and RA-FQ scores when devising treatment strategies for RA flares, suggest researchers.
How Intestinal Glycan Alterations Are Linked to Obesity?
Study reveals the importance of host glycosylation, particularly GlcNAc-6-O-sulfation on intestinal mucins, in safeguarding against obesity and gut inflammation.
Metabolically Healthy Obesity: Truth Vs Myth
Metabolically healthy obesity are obese people with no metabolic complications but are at higher risk of metabolic co-morbidities compared to normal people.
Pathbreaking Anti-Obesity Drug KDS2010 Helps Burn Fat Without Diet Restrictions
KDS2010 drug was found to regulate astrocytes in brain which enhances fat metabolism resulting in weight loss without the need for dietary restrictions.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Naturally Occurring Steroids Encourage Fat Buildup in Body Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests