About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Mediterranean Diet Decreases Prostate Cancer Progression Risk

by Colleen Fleiss on January 9, 2021 at 8:56 AM
Font : A-A+

Mediterranean Diet Decreases Prostate Cancer Progression Risk

Men with localized prostate cancer who followed a Mediterranean-style diet fared better throughout their disease, revealed University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center researchers.

"Men with prostate cancer are motivated to find a way to impact the advancement of their disease and improve their quality of life," said Justin Gregg, M.D., assistant professor of Urology and lead author of the study, published today in Cancer.

Advertisement


Men with a diet that contained more fruits, vegetables, legumes, cereals, and fish had a decreased prostate cancer risk. The researchers also examined the effect of diabetes and statin use and found a similar risk reduction in these patient groups.

A Mediterranean diet's effect was more pronounced in African American participants and others who self-identified as non-white.

"The Mediterranean diet consistently has been linked to lower risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and mortality. This study in men with early stage prostate cancer gets us another step closer to providing evidence-based dietary recommendations to optimize outcomes in cancer patients, who along with their families, have many questions in this area," said Carrie Daniel-MacDougall, Ph.D., associate professor of Epidemiology and senior author of the study.
Advertisement

The study followed 410 men on an active surveillance protocol with Gleason grade group 1 or 2 localized prostate cancer. All study participants underwent a confirmatory biopsy at the beginning of the study and were evaluated every six months through the clinical exam and laboratory studies of serum antigen PSA and testosterone.

Trial participants were 82.9% Caucasian, 8.1% Black, and 9% other or unknown. The median age was 64, 15% of the men had diabetes, and 44% used statins.

The men completed a 170-item baseline food frequency questionnaire, and a Mediterranean diet score was calculated for each participant across 9 energy-adjusted food groups. The participants were then divided into three groups: high, medium, and low adherence to the diet.

The study has identified a significant association between high baseline diet score and lower risk of cancer grade progression.

Health Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet

  • Prevents heart disease and stroke
  • Keeps you agile
  • Reduces Alzheimer's disease risk
  • Increases longevity
  • Protects against type 2 diabetes
Source: Medindia
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Monkeypox Outbreak: What it is, How Does it Spread & the Prevention
Seasonal Allergy Medications
How to Choose the Best Eczema-Friendly Moisturizer for Children?
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Diet Pills Low Carbohydrate Diet Atkins Diet The Cabbage Diet South Beach Diet Mediterranean Diet Prostate Cancer Negative Calorie Diet Cancer and Homeopathy Bulimia Nervosa 

Most Popular on Medindia

Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Accident and Trauma Care Blood Donation - Recipients Selfie Addiction Calculator Find a Doctor Blood Pressure Calculator The Essence of Yoga Vent Forte (Theophylline) Iron Intake Calculator Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam)

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use