About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Lower Risk of Cerebral Palsy in Babies Born in Canada to Immigrant Mothers: Study

by Himabindu Venkatakrishnan on July 15, 2014 at 3:51 PM
Font : A-A+

 Lower Risk of Cerebral Palsy in Babies Born in Canada to Immigrant Mothers: Study

Significantly lower rates of cerebral palsy is seen in babies born to mothers who immigrated to Ontario from other countries, than those of Canadian-born mothers, especially those from the Caribbean and East Asia, new research has found.

"Predicting who is at highest risk of having a child with CP remains an international priority," said lead author Dr. Joel Ray, who notes that CP rates have not declined much over the last decade. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood and appears by the age of four. The underlying injury to the brain with CP is thought to occur before birth, rather than during delivery. Most damage is to the motor neurons of the brain affecting coordination and muscle strength. Dr. Ray, a physician and researcher at St. Michael's Hospital, looked at data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences on all single births in Ontario from 2002 to 2008. Each child was assessed up to age four.

Advertisement

In a paper published today in the online journal PLoS One, he reported there were 1,346 cases of CP among 744,058 live single births. For immigrants, there were 1.45 cases of CP for every 1,000 births, a 23 percent lower risk than for non-immigrants who had 1.92 CP diagnoses per 1,000 births. However, immigrants living in high-income areas were not at lower risk of CP than their non-immigrant counterparts.

Dr. Ray, also a scientist at ICES, said this may be because wealthier immigrants, who have lived in Canada longer, lose the "healthy immigrant effect," where immigrants are generally healthier than people born in Canada. Dr. Ray noted that we still have a poor understanding of how CP arises, so the more scientists can understand the underlying risk factors that predispose someone to CP the closer they may come to developing interventions to prevent CP. Knowing why immigrants are at lower risk of having a child with CP offers clues to discovering ways to prevent CP among all Canadians. About 80 percent of CP cases are due to prenatal injury of the brain and only 10 percent to adverse events after birth.
Advertisement

The most common risk factors are low and high birth weights as well as premature birth -- although half of all children who develop CP are born at term and most cases occur in children with an apparently uncomplicated pregnancy. Dr. Ray said it's also thought that CP and stillbirths share many common risk factors, including placental vascular disease in the mother—such things as preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, placental abruption and placental infarction. Yet, even upon adjusting for these conditions, the risk of CP was still lower among immigrant mothers.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
H1N1 Influenza Prevention in Children: What Parents Need to Know
Dietary Factors Responsible for Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) Production and Hair Loss
Test Your Knowledge About Chromosomes?
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
LASIK Eye Surgery Cerebral Palsy Hamstring Lengthening Surgery Rhizotomy Paralysis Facial Nerve Decompression Monoplegia 

Most Popular on Medindia

Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Post-Nasal Drip Daily Calorie Requirements Blood Donation - Recipients Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Noscaphene (Noscapine) Sanatogen Selfie Addiction Calculator Blood Pressure Calculator Accident and Trauma Care
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Lower Risk of Cerebral Palsy in Babies Born in Canada to Immigrant Mothers: Study Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests