Medindia
Advertisement

Intelligence, Willingness to Co-Operate Among Humans Triggered by Prehistoric Conflict

by Kathy Jones on November 28, 2014 at 4:52 PM

 Intelligence, Willingness to Co-Operate Among Humans Triggered by Prehistoric Conflict
The human brain's willingness to collaborate with others was triggered by prehistoric conflict, a new study reveals.

In the new study at the University of Tennessee, researchers developed a mathematical model that offers answers to how humans evolved high intelligence, required for complex collaborative activities, despite the various costs of having a big brain and how did humans evolve strong innate preferences for cooperative behavior, as cooperative behavior is vulnerable to exploitation by cheaters and "free-riders."
Advertisement

The research, which points to the types of collective actions that are most effective at hastening collaboration, shows that intelligence and cooperative behavior can co-evolve to solve the problem of collective action in groups and also, to overcome the costs of having a large brain.

According to the model, collaborative ability evolves easiest if there is direct conflict or warfare between groups, what lead author Sergey Gavrilets calls "us vs. them" activities and in contrast, collective activities, such as defending against predators or hunting for food, which Gavrilets calls "us vs. nature" activities, are much less likely to result in a significant increase in collaborative abilities.
Advertisement

The study also predicts that if high collaborative ability cannot evolve, perhaps for example because the costs of having a big brain are too high, the species will harbor a small proportion of individuals with a genetic predisposition to perform individually-costly but group-beneficial acts.

In addition, the model challenges influential theories on when large-game hunting and within-group coalitions first appeared in humans. Some scientists say that within-group coalitions and collaborative hunting came first and then subsequently created conditions for the evolution of collaboration in between-group conflicts.

The study is published in the Journal of Royal Society Interface.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Stroop Effect
Plant-Based Diet may Reduce the Risk of COVID-19
Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Linked to Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.


Recommended Reading
Electroencephalogram
An electroencephalogram (EEG) detects electrical activity in the brain using electrodes attached to ...
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, ......
Brilliant Human Brain - Animation
The most amazing and complex organ in the entire universe, the human brain continues to remain an .....

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use