About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Higher Mortality in Postmenopausal Women: Research

by Bidita Debnath on December 23, 2013 at 11:32 PM
Font : A-A+

 Higher Mortality in Postmenopausal Women: Research

Mortality rates are two times higher in postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies, shows new research.

Findings published in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) journal Arthritis & Rheumatism, soon to be called Arthritis & Rheumatology, indicate the higher mortality rates persisted after adjusting for age, positive rheumatoid factor, positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) use.

Advertisement

According to the ACR, RA affects 1.3 million adults in the U.S. with 75% of those being women. Previous studies report that RA patients have mortality rates 1.5-fold higher than healthy controls. Medical evidence suggests that excess mortality is mainly caused by cardiovascular disease and is greater in groups with existing RA compared to those newly diagnosed. However, observational data indicate that methotrexate may reduce cardiovascular disease and mortality.

For the present study researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, led by Drs. Lewis Kuller and Larry Moreland, measured anti-CCP, rheumatoid factor and ANA in close to 10,000 women who self-reported RA as part of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI)—clinical trials and observational study of postmenopausal women, conducted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Participants included in the present research had a mean age of 64 years with 65% white, 25% black and 10% Hispanic.
Advertisement

Results show that anti-CCP was prevalent in 8.1% of the group, of whom 58% reported DMARD use during follow-up. Only 7.3% of the remaining 9,179 women with self-report RA, but negative anti-CCP, were using DMARDs. During the 10-year study period, 13% of women died—14% who self-reported RA at the start of the study and follow-up; 16% who reported RA at baseline; and 11% who reported RA at follow-up.

Further analysis determined that cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease and stroke, and cancer were the main cause of death among women with RA. Women with positive anti-CCP had a substantially higher mortality risk that was independent of DMARD use, including methotrexate, and modifiable risk factors (obesity, smoking) associated with mortality.

"Our study is the first large longitudinal study to evaluate anti-CCP, RF, risk factors and mortality," said Dr. Kuller. "Further investigation to determine specific causes of excess mortality, particularly among RA patients with positive anti-CCP, are needed."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Printed Temperature Sensors help with Continuous Temperature Monitoring
Health Benefits of Giloy
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021 - It's time to RISE
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Menopause Dilatation and Curettage 

Recommended Reading
Hormones at Menopause can Help With Sleep, Memory and More
Researchers at Helsinki University in Finland, finds that hormones at menopause can help with ......
Yoga During Menopause Reduces Insomnia
A recent study finds that a 12-week yoga class and continuing to practice at home has been linked .....
Women Opting for HRT Following Menopause Should Take Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements to Improve Bone Health
A new study says that women who have opted for hormone replacement therapy following menopause ......
Men Blamed For Menopause By Controversial Study
According to a controversial study by Canadian researchers published this week, men and their ......
Menopause
Menopause is defined as the state of permanent cessation of menstrual cycles (periods) for ......

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use