About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Gut Bacteria Linked to Autism-related Behavior

by Sheela Philomena on December 6, 2013 at 11:32 AM
Font : A-A+

 Gut Bacteria Linked to Autism-related Behavior

Bacteria living in the gut are linked to neurodevelopmental symptoms in the mice, reveals study published in Cell. What's more, when researchers treated those animals with bacteria found in the healthy gut, a number of behavioral abnormalities including anxiety-like behavior largely went away.

"Several studies have shown that the microbiota can influence a variety of behaviors, from anxiety and pain to social and emotional behavior," said Elaine Hsiao from the California Institute of Technology. "Our work is the first to demonstrate that modulating the microbiota can influence autism-related behaviors in the context of a disease model."

Advertisement

Although the researchers urge caution, the findings link at least some symptoms of ASD to the gut and suggest that probiotics might have a therapeutic role in such cases. They say clinical trials are now needed to gather the evidence to verify this link found in mice.

Hsiao, along with Paul Patterson, Sarkis Mazmanian, and their colleagues, knew that some individuals with ASD also suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms. To investigate the connection, they looked to the maternal immune activation (MIA) mouse model, which has previously been used to model several neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. What they uncovered in offspring of MIA animals with autism-like symptoms were gastrointestinal abnormalities and changes in the gut microbial community.
Advertisement

When the mice were given oral doses of the human gut microbe Bacteroides fragilis, their gastrointestinal and behavioral abnormalities were relieved. Further work showed that MIA mice have altered blood levels of some metabolites, many of which are modulated by B. fragilis. When otherwise normal mice were treated with a metabolite found at elevated levels in MIA animals, they too showed certain behavioral abnormalities, suggesting a direct link between gut bacteria, metabolites, and behavior.

"Taken together," the researchers concluded, "these findings support a gut-microbiome-brain connection in a mouse model of neurodevelopmental disorders and identify a potential probiotic therapy for gastrointestinal and behavioral symptoms in human disorders, including autism."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
World Hypertension Day 2022 - Measure Blood Pressure Accurately, Control It, Live Longer!
Drinking This Popular Beverage May Drop Dementia Risk
Worst Mistakes Parents Make When Talking to Kids
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Shigellosis MRSA - The Super Bug Probiotics - Support System for the Gut Food Safety for Health Antibiotics Your Guide to a Good Gut Amazing Benefits of Gut Bacteria Leaky Gut Syndrome Microbial Link between Gut Health and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) 

Most Popular on Medindia

Blood Pressure Calculator Noscaphene (Noscapine) Sanatogen Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Vent Forte (Theophylline) Blood Donation - Recipients Drug Side Effects Calculator The Essence of Yoga Daily Calorie Requirements Indian Medical Journals

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use