About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Genetic Mutations Influence Outcomes in Lymphoma Patients Who Undergo Transplants

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on December 7, 2016 at 4:11 PM
Font : A-A+

 Genetic Mutations Influence Outcomes in Lymphoma Patients Who Undergo Transplants

Stem cell transplants are sometimes used to treat lymphoma patients. A significant percentage of lymphoma patients undergoing transplants with their own blood stem cells carry acquired genetic mutations that increase their risks of developing second hematologic cancers and dying from other causes, revealed a study from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The mutations were found in about 30% of 401 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) whose blood was sampled at the time they received autologous transplants, the scientists reported at the 58th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Diego. Patients older than 60 were more likely to carry the mutations, which occurred in several different genes, and were acquired, not inherited.

Advertisement


Transplant recipients who were mutation carriers had a higher risk - 14.4% versus 4.4% - of developing a second blood cancer over the next 10 years compared with those lacking the mutation. The second cancers were acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome.

Carriers of the mutations were also less likely to survive for 10 years (30.6% versus 60.9%) than individuals lacking the mutations. The greater mortality in mutation carriers wasn't only due to second cancers, but was also the result of other conditions such as heart attacks and strokes, for reasons the scientists say aren't yet clear.
Advertisement

The most commonly mutated gene in the transplant patients was PPM1D, which plays a key role in cells' DNA damage repair toolkit.

The mutations cause an abnormal condition called CHIP (clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential), an age-related phenomenon that occurs in 10 to 15% of patients over age 65. In clonal hematopoiesis, some blood-forming stem cells acquire mutations and spawn clones - subpopulations of identical cells that expand because they have gained a competitive advantage over normal stem cells. Individuals with CHIP don't have symptoms or obvious abnormalities in their blood counts, but researchers are studying whether CHIP in some cases might represent the earliest seeds of blood cancers.

The new study is the first to systematically look at how CHIP influences outcomes in patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplants, according to the report, whose first author is Christopher J. Gibson of Dana-Farber. The senior author is Benjamin L. Ebert of Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center.

Gibson noted that 30% of the patients with CHIP had more than one mutation, and those patients had even greater odds of developing second cancers and their overall survival was worse than individuals having only one mutation.

The CHIP mutations may be caused by a combination of aging and prior treatment with chemotherapy for their disease, and could also be related to the lymphoma itself, Gibson said.

The authors said the study findings may have clinical implications. "They suggest the need to specifically study the connection between CHIP and lymphoma more deeply, which could be accomplished by assessing CHIP in patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma prior to the administration of any chemotherapy or mobilizing agents," they wrote. "They also suggest the need to consider alternative therapeutic approaches" for lymphoma patients who have a high risk of developing second cancers and are being considered for autologous stem cell transplants.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Genetic Mutations Influence Outcomes in Lymphoma Patients Who Undergo Transplants Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests