Exercise Could Help Reduce the Side-effects of Prostate Hormone Therapy

by Iswarya on  December 10, 2019 at 2:18 PM Cancer News
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Some of the harmful side-effects of hormone therapy are decreased in men with prostate cancer who begin to exercise regularly around the same time these drugs are prescribed, reports a new study. The findings of the study are published in the journal BJU International.
Exercise Could Help Reduce the Side-effects of Prostate Hormone Therapy
Exercise Could Help Reduce the Side-effects of Prostate Hormone Therapy

Researchers from the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) and UEA led a trial which involved patients who were due to start androgen deprivation therapy (ADT).

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Fifty patients took part in the research study, with half of the participants taking part in two supervised exercise sessions a week for three months at specialist exercise science facilities at UEA. The trial aimed to reduce the adverse side-effects of hormone therapy such as weight gain and an increased risk of heart problems and assessed participants' health three months after their exercise program.

The findings showed that the three-month program of aerobic and resistance training intervention prevented adverse changes in cardiopulmonary fitness and fatigue for those taking part in the trial.

Prof John Saxton, from UEA's Norwich Medical School, said: "Structured exercise programs have much to offer people living with common cancers. Hormone treatments for prostate cancer are known to have undesirable side-effects, which increase a man's susceptibility to cardiovascular disease.

"Our findings have important implications for the quality of prostate cancer survival," he added.

Wilphard Ndjavera, Clinical Fellow for Urology at NNUH, said: "All the patients really enjoyed the sessions, and the results have suggested that exercise does work to reduce these harmful side effects of treatment. It is one of only two studies in the world to look at this."

"After the supervised exercise was withdrawn, differences in cardiopulmonary fitness and fatigue were not sustained, but the exercise group showed a higher quality of life and reduced cardiovascular risk compared to the control group."

"These findings have important implications for clinicians concerned with the management of ADT-related side-effects."

Source: Eurekalert

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