About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Equine Influenza Undergoes Evolution!

by Dr. Enozia Vakil on June 23, 2014 at 6:13 PM
Font : A-A+

 Equine Influenza Undergoes Evolution!

Equine influenza viruses from the 1960s do not infect the respiratory tract of dogs, but those from the 2000s are able to, a new research has found. The research also suggests that canine and human influenza viruses can mix, and generate new influenza viruses.

Canine influenza is a relatively new disease. The first appearance is believed to be in 2003, as a result of direct transfer of a single equine influenza virus to dogs in a large greyhound training facility and was subsequently carried to many states by the infected greyhound, say the researchers. Similar transfers have occurred among foxhounds in the UK, and in dogs kept near infected horses during a 2007 outbreak in Australia, they report.

Advertisement

In the study, investigators from the United States and the United Kingdom infected dog tracheal explant cultures—essentially pieces of trachea cultured in the laboratory to mimic the cellular complexity and the host physiology of the host—with canine influenza virus, equine influenza virus, and human influenza viruses. (The use of explants has increased in recent years, and they have been shown to be useful for studies of viral pathogenesis.) They then compared the growth of the viruses, and the damage they wrought.

Infection of equine influenza virus from 2003 caused an infection much like that from canine influenza virus in terms of the virus' rate of replication and the extensive tissue damage it caused. In contrast, viruses from 1963 replicated poorly, and caused relatively minor lesions in comparison with the 2003 virus.
Advertisement

The investigators also transfected cells with DNA containing the genes of both canine and human influenza viruses, to determine whether the genes from the two viruses were compatible with each other.

"We showed that the genes are indeed compatible, and we also showed that chimeric viruses carrying human and canine influenza genes can infect the dog tracheas," says corresponding author Pablo Murcia of the University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, UK.

That, he says, means that such chimeric viruses might occur naturally, and would likely be able to infect dogs. These findings have significant implications because they show that dogs might act as "mixing vessels" in which novel viruses with pandemic potential could emerge.

Studies investigating whether they could infect human lungs are underway.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Alarming Cesarean Section Trends in India - Convenience or Compulsion of Corporate Healthcare
Quiz on Low-Calorie Diet for Diabetes
World Heart Day in 2022- Use Heart for Every Heart
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Hib Vaccine Flu Swine Flu Reye’s Syndrome Preventing Flu: Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs Ways to Boost Your Immune System during Cold and Flu Season 

Most Popular on Medindia

Accident and Trauma Care Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Blood Donation - Recipients Daily Calorie Requirements Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Sanatogen Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Selfie Addiction Calculator Iron Intake Calculator Diaphragmatic Hernia
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Equine Influenza Undergoes Evolution! Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests