Medindia
Advertisement

Dietary Fatty Acid Intake may Help Reduce the Risk for Lou Gehrig Disease

by Bidita Debnath on July 19, 2014 at 10:33 PM
Font : A-A+

 Dietary Fatty Acid Intake may Help Reduce the Risk for Lou Gehrig Disease

Bottom Line: Eating foods high in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from vegetable and marine sources may help reduce the risk for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

ALS is the fatal neurodegenerative disease commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Advertisement

Author: Kathryn C. Fitzgerald, M.Sc., of the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, and colleagues.

Background: PUFAs can help modulate inflammation and oxidative stress, mechanisms that have been implicated in the cause of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. But data regarding PUFA intake and ALS risk are sparse.
Advertisement

How the Study Was Conducted: Authors examined the association of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA consumption and ALS risk in an analysis of more than 1 million people from five different study groups. Diet was assessed through questionnaires. For men, median ω-3 PUFA intake ranged from 1.40 to 1.85 grams(g)/day(d) and median ω-6 PUFA intake ranged from 11.82 to 15.73 g/d. For women, median ω-3 intake ranged from 1.14 to 1.43 g/d and median ω-6 PUFA intake ranged from 8.94 to 12.01 g/d.

Results: Researchers documented 995 ALS cases during follow-up, which ranged from nine to 24 years. A greater ω-3 PUFA intake was associated with a reduced risk for ALS. Consuming both α-linolenic acid (ALA, which can be found in plant sources and nuts) and marine ω-3 PUFAs contributed to this association. Intake of ω-6 PUFAs was not associated with ALS risk.

Discussion: "Overall, the results of our large prospective cohort study suggest that individuals with higher dietary intakes of total ω-3 PUFA and ALA have a reduced risk for ALS. Further research, possibly including biomarkers of PUFA intake, should be pursued to confirm these findings and to determine whether high ω-3 PUFA intake could be beneficial in individuals with ALS."

(JAMA Neurol. Published online July 14, 2014. doi:10.1001/.jamaneurol.2014.1214. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: This work was supported by grants from the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, the National Cancer Institute and the ALS Therapy Alliance Foundation. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Editorial: Diet and Risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

In a related editorial, Michael Swash, M.D., of the Royal London Hospital, England, writes: "How should this study direct our attention?"

"Fitzgerald and colleagues suggest that the fatty acid composition of cell plasma membranes, which could be measured in red cell membranes, might be important in modulating oxidative stress responses, excitotoxicity and inflammation, all factors that have been implicated in ALS and other neurodegenerative conditions," the author continues.

"As a note of caution and in contrast to their results, the authors note that in a mouse model of ALS pretreatment with high doses of eicosapentanoic acid, a long-chain ω-3 PUFA, accelerated disease progression," Swash notes.

(JAMA Neurol. Published online July 14, 2014. doi:10.1001/.jamaneurol.2014.1894. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
World Alzheimer's Day 2021 - 'Know Dementia, Know Alzheimer's
'Hybrid Immunity' may Help Elude COVID-19 Pandemic
Stroop Effect
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Traumatizing Trans Fats Top Beauty Foods to Look Younger and Glowing 

Recommended Reading
Spinal Muscular Atrophy - New Approaches
In a recent research work, researchers show how loss or mutation of the Spinal muscular atropy ......
Genetics Behind Lou Gehrig's Disease Progression Uncovered
University of Tokyo researchers claim to have gained valuable insights into the genetics of ......
Researchers Create Transgenic Mouse That can Synthesize Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids
A transgenic mouse that can synthesize omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids within its tissues ...
Link Between Fatty Acids and Heart Disease to be Explored More Suggests New Evidence
Current guidelines restricting the consumption of saturated fats and encouraging the consumption of ...
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
Find out more about the degenerative disease- Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis....
Top Beauty Foods to Look Younger and Glowing
Eating the right foods will enhance your beauty inside out. So, eliminate processed foods, refined s...
Traumatizing Trans Fats
Artificial trans fats are created when vegetable oils are partially hydrogenated to form "trans" uns...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use