About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Crusty Food Increases Risk of Heart Disease Among Diabetics

by Kathy Jones on October 25, 2012 at 7:49 PM
Font : A-A+

 Crusty Food Increases Risk of Heart Disease Among Diabetics

A new study has warned diabetic patients to stay away from crusty foods as it produces advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that can increase the risk of heart disease as they are associated with plaque formation.

This is the conclusion of a University of Illinois study.

Advertisement

"We see evidence that cooking methods that create a crust-think the edge of a brownie or the crispy borders of meats prepared at very high temperatures-produce advanced glycation end products (AGEs). And AGEs are associated with plaque formation, the kind we see in cardiovascular disease," said Karen Chapman-Novakofski, a U of I professor of nutrition.

For years nutrition experts have advised people with diabetes to bake, boil, or grill their food instead of frying it, she said.

"That's still true, but if you have diabetes, you should know that AGEs-byproducts of food preparation methods that feature very high, intense, dry heat-tend to end up on other tissues in the body, causing long-term damage," she added.
Advertisement

If you're fighting this vascular buildup anyway, Chapman-Novakofski thinks that consuming products containing AGEs could worsen the cardiovascular complications of diabetes.

In the U of I study, the scientists compared the 10-day food intake of 65 study participants in two ethnic groups: Mexicans (who have higher rates of diabetes and a greater risk of complications from the disease) and non-Hispanic whites.

"We found that people with higher rates of cardiovascular complications ate more of these glycated products. For each unit increase in AGEs intake, a study participant was 3.7 times more likely to have moderate to high risk for cardiovascular disease," said Claudia Luevano-Contreras, first author of the study.

The study showed that non-Hispanic whites had a higher intake of AGEs, and they consumed more saturated fats. However, the association between AGEs and cardiovascular disease was stronger than for saturated fats and heart disease, she said.

Eating less saturated fat and more fruits, vegetables, and fiber are important for people with diabetes, but this study shows that food preparation may be important too, she added.

"AGEs are higher in any kind of meat, but especially in ground meat. If you put hamburgers or brats on the grill, you'll likely have a higher AGEs content than if you chose a whole cut of meat, say round steak or chicken," said Chapman-Novakofski.

Boiling or stewing meat would reduce your AGEs intake further. And scrambling an egg with cooking spray instead of frying it leads to a significant reduction in AGEs, she added.

The scientists said more research is needed before definite recommendations can be made. They are planning another study in which they'll examine past AGEs intake of diabetes patients.

"These findings are preliminary, but they give us ample reason to further explore the association between AGEs and cardiovascular risk among people with diabetes," Chapman-Novakofski noted.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
COVID Toes
International Yoga Day 2022 - 'Yoga for Humanity'
Wearable Devices Are Now Transforming Depression, Multiple Sclerosis, and Epilepsy Management.
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Diabetes - Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Cardiac Catheterization Diabetes and Exercise Heart Attack Air travel: To fly or not to fly Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Body Mass Index Silent Killer Diseases Heart 

Most Popular on Medindia

Color Blindness Calculator Iron Intake Calculator Drug Side Effects Calculator Hearing Loss Calculator Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects Blood - Sugar Chart Daily Calorie Requirements Accident and Trauma Care How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine)

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
CONSULT A DOCTOR