About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Changes in DNA Sequence of Genes Influence Risk of Colorectal Cancer in African Americans

by Kathy Jones on November 1, 2012 at 6:35 PM
Font : A-A+

 Changes in DNA Sequence of Genes Influence Risk of Colorectal Cancer in African Americans

A new study presented at the Fifth AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities reveals that the risk of colorectal cancer in African Americans can be influenced by how the body produces and destroys vitamin D due to changes in DNA sequence of genes.

"Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk for colorectal cancer," said Fabio Pibiri, Ph.D., a postdoctoral associate at the University of Illinois at Chicago. "Because increased skin pigment lowers the amount of ultraviolet light that can be used to make vitamin D in the skin, more African-Americans than whites are vitamin D-deficient, putting them at higher risk for colorectal cancer. Our research showed that genetic differences may play an important role as well."

Advertisement

Pibiri and colleagues evaluated 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), DNA sequence variations, in vitamin D-related genes in 1,799 African-Americans - 961 patients with colorectal cancer and 838 controls - who participated in the North Carolina Colorectal Cancer Study and the Chicago Colorectal Cancer Consortium.

They found several SNPs in genes involved in the generation and destruction of vitamin D that were associated with colorectal cancer.

One variation in the gene that tells a cell to make the protein that destroys vitamin D was linked to protection from developing colorectal cancer on the left side of the body. According to Pibiri, this variation is specific to African-Americans and the finding may explain why African-Americans have a lower proportion of left-sided colorectal cancer compared with right-sided colorectal cancer.
Advertisement

"It seems likely that these differences in the DNA sequence alter the function of the vitamin D-related genes," said Pibiri. "For example, we hypothesize that the genetic variation linked to protection decreases levels of the vitamin D-destroying protein. Now all we need to do is show that."

The National Institutes of Health, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Cancer Society Illinois Division provided funding for this research.

Source: Newswise
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Top 10 Foods for Decreasing DHT Production and Preventing Hair Fall
Alarming Cesarean Section Trends in India - Convenience or Compulsion of Corporate Healthcare
Quiz on Low-Calorie Diet for Diabetes
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
DNA Finger Printing Cancer and Homeopathy Colo-rectal cancer - Management Colorectal Cancer Cancer Facts Genetic Testing of Diseases Cancer Tattoos A Body Art Epigenetics Colon Polyps 

Most Popular on Medindia

Find a Hospital Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Selfie Addiction Calculator Blood Donation - Recipients Blood Pressure Calculator Color Blindness Calculator Drug Interaction Checker Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
CONSULT ONLINE WITH A DOCTOR

×

Changes in DNA Sequence of Genes Influence Risk of Colorectal Cancer in African Americans Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests