Can Cannabinoids Treat Cancer?

by Rishika Gupta on  November 7, 2017 at 5:18 PM Drug News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

Cannabinoids can cause cell death in cancer cells by activating their cell death pathways found a new study published in Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.
 Can Cannabinoids Treat Cancer?
Can Cannabinoids Treat Cancer?

Their potential use as antitumor drugs and to boost the effectiveness of conventional cancer therapies is examined in an article published in The Journal, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on JACM website.

Show Full Article


In "A Review of the Therapeutic Antitumor Potential of Cannabinoids," coauthors Višnja Bogdanovi And Jasminka Mrdjanovi, Oncology Institute of Vojvodina (Sremska Kamenica, Serbia), and Ivana Borišev, University of Novi Sad (Serbia) present the results of a detailed survey of the medical and scientific literature focused on the effects of cannabinoids on signaling pathways involved in tumor cell proliferation and death.

The researchers review the mechanisms of anticancer activity of cannabinoids, discuss the similarities and differences between exogenous (plant-derived) and endogenous cannabinoids, report on the clinical studies conducted to date to assess the anti-tumor effects of these compounds, and consider the possible adjuvant properties of cannabinoids in cancer treatment.

"Although medical cannabis is well-supported in the literature for symptom reduction from cancer treatment or the disease itself, there are many claims that cannabis can treat cancer itself," says Leslie Mendoza Temple, MD, ABOIM, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and Medical Director, Integrative Medicine Program. "So far, this is based on only a handful of small human studies, anecdote, or laboratory research.

This article nicely summarizes some of the work done in the lab for an understanding of cannabis' potential anti-cancer mechanisms, while pointing to the paucity of human trials." Dr. Temple adds, "Federal rescheduling of cannabis is critical so we can study its effects in humans and determine cannabis' direct or indirect effects on cancer cells."

"The value of the review from Bogdanovi, Mrdjanovi, and Borišev is describing the evidence landscape that is generating claims for this very political herb," says JACM Editor-in-Chief John Weeks, johnweeks-integrator.com, Seattle, WA. He adds: "The evidence supports freeing researchers to provide us with more answers."

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Premium Membership Benefits

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive