About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Black Americans More at Risk of the World's Most Common STI

by Hannah Joy on March 16, 2018 at 2:29 PM
Font : A-A+

Black Americans More at Risk of the World's Most Common STI

Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) is the world's most common curable sexually transmitted infection (STI) was found to disproportionately affect the black Americans.

A report of the new Johns Hopkins study, published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, highlights the major racial/ethnic disparities in TV infection in the United States population, calling on the need to improve racial equity in sexual health.

Advertisement


"These findings are likely reflective of real social and structural disparities, such as lower access to health care, that result in high infection rates in the black community. Targeted public health education about Trichomonas will be critical," says Aaron Tobian, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the study's senior author.

Trichomonas vaginalis infection is caused by a protozoan parasite and is asymptomatic in most people. In women, TV infection cases can be characterized by a foul-smelling vaginal discharge, painful urination and abdominal pain. Similar urination and abdominal symptoms can be seen in men. However, if TV infection is left untreated, it can lead to severe consequences in women, such as pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility.
Advertisement

Unlike with some other STIs, there are currently no routine surveillance or reporting programs for TV in the United States, and only two previous studies have ever examined its prevalence on a national scale, according to Tobian. Those studies, he says, only focused on women or a younger population.

To examine the prevalence of TV infection in both males and females 18 to 59 years old, Tobian and colleagues used data from the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a collection of health information from the United States' noninstitutionalized, civilian population that includes valid TV results from urine samples.

Of the 4,057 participants, 1,942 were males, 2,115 were females, 822 identified as non-Hispanic black and 3,235 identified as other races/ethnicities.

While the prevalence of TV infection was 0.03 and 0.8 percent among males and females of other races/ethnicities, the burden of TV infection was significantly higher among black males and females: 4.2 percent and 8.9 percent, respectively.

Higher prevalence of TV infection was associated with being female, black, older, having less than a high school education and living below poverty level, independent of having multiple sexual partners. TV prevalence was also higher among older individuals (i.e., 25-59 years old compared to age 18-24).

People below poverty level had a prevalence of 3.9 percent versus 0.6 percent for those at or above poverty level, and individuals without a high school education had a prevalence of 2.9 percent versus 0.8 percent for those with at least a high school education.

Currently, screening for TV infection is only recommended for people who are HIV-positive. Eshan U. Patel, M.P.H., lead author of the study, says the new findings should encourage broader screening initiatives, educational programming and policy changes to ensure access to sexual health care.

"It's unfortunate that TV infection hasn't received a stronger public health response, especially since it is easy to diagnose and treat," says Patel. TV infection can be detected using the same diagnostic platform as the one used for Chlamydia and can be cured with just one pill (metronidazole).



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2021 - Fighting for Rights in the Post-COVID Era
Effect of Blood Group Type on COVID-19 Risk and Severity
Woman with Rare Spinal Cord Defect from Birth Sues Doctor
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Anal Warts 

Recommended Reading
Ankle Injuries and Disorders
The ankle is among the most commonly injured parts of the body. It has to support the entire weight ...
Aplastic Anemia
Aplastic anemia (AA) is a term that refers to a condition where the body fails to produce enough ......
Artificial Sweeteners
Artificial Sweetener is a sugar substitute with fewer or no calories. High-intensity sweeteners are ...
Astigmatism
Astigmatism is a refractive error of the eye, which causes blurred or distorted vision. Astigmatism ...
Anal Warts
Anal warts or genital warts are soft bumps caused by Human Papilloma Virus and are a sexually transm...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use