About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Baby Brains Respond to Other's Actions, A First Step In Learning By Imitation

by Bidita Debnath on November 3, 2013 at 9:27 PM
Font : A-A+

 Baby Brains Respond to Other's Actions, A First Step In Learning By Imitation

For adults, imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery but for babies it's their foremost tool for learning.

As renowned people-watchers, babies often observe others demonstrate how to do things and then copy those body movements. It's how little ones know, usually without explicit instructions, to hold a toy phone to the ear or guide a spoon to the mouth.

Advertisement

Now researchers from the University of Washington and Temple University have found the first evidence revealing a key aspect of the brain processing that occurs in babies to allow this learning by observation.

The findings, published online Oct. 30 by PLOS ONE, are the first to show that babies' brains showed specific activation patterns when an adult performed a task with different parts of her body. When 14-month-old babies simply watched an adult use her hand to touch a toy, the hand area of the baby's brain lit up. When another group of infants watched an adult touch the toy using only her foot, the foot area of the baby's brain showed more activity.
Advertisement

"Babies are exquisitely careful people-watchers, and they're primed to learn from others," said Andrew Meltzoff, co-author and co-director of the UW Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences. "And now we see that when babies watch someone else, it activates their own brains. This study is a first step in understanding the neuroscience of how babies learn through imitation."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Link between Dietary Intake of Plant-based Essential Fatty Acids and Death Risk
Aspirin may be Harmful When Used for Preventing 1st Heart Attack, Stroke
Pregnancy Complications Elevated Among Symptomatic COVID-19 Women
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Pregnancy and Antenatal Care Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) 

Recommended Reading
Germany Allows Babies to be Categorised Under 'Neither Male Nor Female'
Germany has become the first country in the world to allow babies born with the characteristics of ....
Snoring During Pregnancy Increases Risk of Delivering Smaller Babies, Says Research
Pregnant women who snore at least three nights a week are at an increased risk of having C-sections ...
Study Says Fit Pregnant Women Give Birth to Healthier Babies
Women who stay fit during their pregnancy have babies with healthier hearts, say scientists....
Component in Breast Milk Can Protect Babies Against HIV
Recent research has found that breast milk has the ability to protect babies from getting infected ....
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, writte...
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
Neonatal abstinence syndrome is a condition where newborn babies experience withdrawal symptoms due ...
Pregnancy and Antenatal Care
What is Antenatal care and its importance during pregnancy for mother and baby, with details on the ...
Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ)
Intelligence quotient (IQ) is a psychological measure of human intelligence. Regular physical and me...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use