About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Autism in Mice Linked With Abnormalities in Genes Associated With Brain Development

by Kathy Jones on April 18, 2013 at 8:06 PM
Font : A-A+

 Autism in Mice Linked With Abnormalities in Genes Associated With Brain Development

A new study conducted by American researchers on a group of mice has linked autism with abnormalities in specific regions of their chromosomes in genes associated with aberrant brain development and activity.

"These discoveries in mice may eventually pave the way towards understanding autism in human patients and devising new treatments," said co-senior author, Elliott H. Sherr, MD, PhD, a pediatric neurologist at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital and professor of neurology at UC San Francisco (UCSF).

Advertisement

The findings are reported in a study published on April 15 in PLOS One.

The scientists bred a group of normal mice with a line of genetically modified mice that exhibit behaviors which are the mouse equivalent of autism. The 400 descendants of that crossbreeding, explained Sherr, "had a random assortment of genetics - some normal and healthy, some aberrant."
Advertisement

The scientists exhaustively observed and recorded the behavior of each descendant mouse. Since each animal's genetic makeup was already known, the researchers were able to pinpoint associations between specific autistic behaviors and specific chromosomal regions.

"This allowed us to say which regions we think contain the genes that contribute to which behavior," said Sherr.

Sherr noted that those regions "contain genes that are already known to cause autism in humans, or are involved in brain development in such a way that makes it likely that they can cause autism."

To test for autistic behavior, the mice were put in the middle chamber of an enclosure with three chambers. In the chamber on one side was another mouse; in the other, an inanimate object. "Mice are social animals, so a normal mouse would spend much more time in the chamber with the other mouse," said Sherr. "An autistic mouse would spend more time with the object, or equal time with the object and the other mouse, because it didn't care."

The researchers also observed what the mice did when they were in a chamber together. "A healthy mouse will spend a lot of time sniffing or interacting with the other mouse, while an autistic mouse will roam around the chamber ignoring the other mouse as if it was inanimate," said Sherr.

The research will have a number of potential benefits, he said, particularly once researchers pinpoint the exact locations of the genes on the chromosomes. "Having the genes means that you can begin to pick apart the connection between the genes and the actual behavior, and look at how the mutation on a gene might result in aberrant behavior. Having an animal model means that you can look at the anatomy in a more careful way, study the cells in a tissue culture dish and manipulate them in other ways."

Scientists will also be able to test the effects of exposure to toxins and other substances on the development of autism, he said.

Eventually, said Sherr, "Having an animal model will let us test potential drugs to treat autism."



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Turmeric: Magic Ingredient to Keep you Healthy in Winter
Top 7 Benefits of Good Oral Hygiene
Healthy and Safer Thanksgiving 2021
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Autism Parkinsons Disease Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Brain Brain Facts Ataxia Rett Syndrome Weaver Syndrome Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia Language Areas in The Brain 

Recommended Reading
Autism
Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder typically characterized by impaired social and ......
Rett Syndrome
Rett Syndrome is a neurological disorder that affects development. It mostly affects the girl ......
Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia
Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia or Landau –Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) is a rare childhood disorder in whi...
Ataxia
Ataxia affects coordination. Gait becomes unstable and the patient loses balance. The cerebellum or ...
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, writte...
Parkinsons Disease
Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive dopamine brain cells loss. ...
Weaver Syndrome
Weaver syndrome is a genetic disorder in which children show accelerated bone growth, advanced bone ...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use