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Hate flossing? No problem, Waterpik® Dental Water Jet will do the needful

by Medindia Content Team on  October 6, 2005 at 8:31 PM Health Watch   - G J E 4
It is always a good idea to regularly floss your teeth or so your dentist tells you. But then the whole process is cumbersome and a larger percentage of the population does not indulge in flossing. Consequently, plaque accumulates in between the teeth and this leads to gum problems including bleeding gums, receding gums and bad breath.
Hate flossing? No problem, Waterpik® Dental Water Jet will do the needful
Hate flossing? No problem, Waterpik® Dental Water Jet will do the needful
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New research presented today at the American Dental Association's (ADA) annual conference in Philadelphia says that there is a viable alternative to flossing- the Waterpik® Dental Water Jet.

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The Waterpik® Dental Water Jet is a device that operates by delivering high water pressure and pulsation that cleans areas below the gum more effectively than a traditional tooth brush or even the dental floss. It delivers 1,200 pulsations/minute and a pressure of 55-90 psi (pounds per square inch), a combination that was termed ideal by university researchers in over 46 clinical studies. Analyzing the data from these studies, researchers concluded that the Waterpik® Dental Water Jet was 93 percent more efficient in cleaning plaque and debris and thus reducing bleeding gums that are a sure indicator of underlying gum disease. The device also massages and stimulates gums thereby ensuring a better blood supply to the area.

Commenting on the findings, Deborah Lyle, RDH, MS, and Director of Clinical Affairs, Waterpik said, "The results of this study are so dramatic that we wanted consumers to know that the Waterpik® Dental Water Jet is an easy, effective alternative that fits effortlessly into their existing oral care routines. In fact, no matter what type of tooth brush you use, the Waterpik® Dental Water Jet can significantly improve your gum health."

The details of the study are published in the latest issue of the Journal of Clinical Dentistry.
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