Fresh Food and Less Sodium Keeps Your Heart Healthy

by VR Sreeraman on  February 17, 2012 at 7:05 PM Diet & Nutrition News   - G J E 4
An expert has stressed the need for eating fresh foods and reducing the sodium intake in order to keep ones heart healthy.

A healthy diet sustains us, but a poor diet can lead to increased blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar levels and weight and put you at heart disease risk.
 Fresh Food and Less Sodium Keeps Your Heart Healthy
Fresh Food and Less Sodium Keeps Your Heart Healthy

According to Donna Arnett, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Epidemiology in the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health and president-elect of the American Heart Association, diet is only 'one component of the overall cause of heart disease.'

But, Arnett asserted that it can exert a strong influence.

Sodium also is considered the culprit for the one in three Americans who develop high blood pressure. Sodium attracts water into your cells; the increased fluid raises your blood pressure and subsequently raises your risk of stroke and heart attack, heart failure and death, Arnett says.

Race also plays a role in risk. UAB researchers recently examined the effects of sodium intake by race using data from the ongoing Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke and found a stronger association with death in black participants than whites, says Suzanne Judd, assistant professor of biostatistics at UAB and the study's lead author.

Blacks with the highest sodium intake (average of 2,600 mg/day) had a 62 percent increased risk of dying, while whites had no increased risk, she said.

"This supports the AHA recommendation that there may need to be race-specific sodium guidelines, but everyone should reduce their sodium intake," Judd says.

The AHA has an aggressive sodium goal of 1,500 mg per day for everyone.

First, Arnett said, increase the amount of fruits and vegetables you eat daily, especially the leafy kind.

"This provides more potassium, which is associated with lower blood pressure," Arnett said.

"Fresh is the best source for fruits and vegetables, but canned versions can provide nutrition."

The primary drawback to canned and frozen foods is added sodium.

But Arnett offers a solution: "Rinse these foods before cooking to help reduce sodium. Once rinsed, I think they are a great option for people on the go."

Fish also is on Arnett's list of better food choices.

"You should eat fish twice per week; fish are sources of the good fats associated with reduced risk of heart disease," said Arnett.

When preparing your food, limit saturated fats such as those in butter, hard cheeses and red meats.

"Avoid trans fats because they raise your bad cholesterol levels. So read food labels and look for partially hydrogenated oils, which is another name for trans fats," Arnett says.

Fats considered to be suitable for low consumption - avocados, nuts, olives and olive oil - are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which can help reduce the cholesterol levels in your blood and lower your risk of heart disease.

A big calorie-causing culprit is sodas and sports and energy drinks, Arnett says.

"The hidden sugars in these beverages are a common cause of weight gain among young people. Limiting yourself to two 12 oz. cans per week to reduce the risk of obesity and diabetes," Arnett added.

Source: ANI

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