Neuroscience Explains How the Brain Remembers Specific Fears

by Tanya Thomas on  April 5, 2010 at 11:41 AM Research News   - G J E 4
 Neuroscience Explains How the Brain Remembers Specific Fears
The human brain is capable of remembering and retrieving memories of certain specific fears, neuroscientists have found.

The discovery reveals a more sophisticated storage and recall capacity of the brain than previously thought, boffins claim.

The study, which appears in the journal Nature Neuroscience, was conducted by researchers at New York University's Center for Neural Science, the Department of Psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine-Bellevue Hospital Center, the Copernicus Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Krakow, Poland, Universiti Paris-Sud, and the Emotional Brain Institute at the Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research.

The research focused on the brain's amygdala, which has previously been shown to store fear memories.

The scientists on the Nature Neuroscience study sought to determine if there were differences in how the amygdala processes and remembers fears. In order to do so, they focused on a process called memory consolidation in which an experience is captured, or encoded, then stored.

Once consolidation occurs, memories may be long lasting-one experience may create memories that last a lifetime. However, whenever recalled, memories become labile-that is, susceptible to changes. This process is called reconsolidation. In life, reconsolidation allows updating existing memories. But this process also serves as a valuable methodological tool as it lets researchers control the modification of memories.

When it comes to developing fear memories, one model posits that during a fear experience, a neutral stimulus (e.g., a musical passage) becomes associated with a negative encounter (e.g., a dog bite). Therefore, future occurrences of this neutral stimulus, or conditioned stimulus (CS), forewarns the onset of the negative encounter, or unconditioned stimulus (US).

To replicate this process, the researchers devised an experiment using laboratory rats. In it, they paired two distinct audio tones, which served as the neutral stimulus, or conditioned stimulus (CS), with mild electric shocks to different parts of the rats' bodies. As a result, the rats linked a mild shock to a certain part of their bodies with a certain tone.

Under the memory reconsolidation model, exposing an organism to any aspect of the learned experience brings this memory back to mind and makes it susceptible to changes. Thus, if two distinct tones were each paired with two distinct electric shocks and if the amygdala does not discriminate among different threats, then re-exposing a rat to any of these shocks should cause lability of all fear memories stored in the amygdala.

However, the Nature Neuroscience study yielded quite different results. The researchers found that re-exposing a rat to a particular shock (that is, one applied to a certain part of the body), followed by an injection of an antibiotic known to disrupt reconsolidation processes, impaired only these associations that were linked to this particular shock. Despite the disruption of one type of fear memory, rats were still able to express fear behavior to the tone which had been paired with a shock applied to another part of the body.

The discovery demonstrates that the amygdala makes distinctions among the fear memories it holds and retrieves.

Source: ANI

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

View All