About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Salt-To Add or Not To?

by Dr. Enozia Vakil on September 8, 2013 at 5:15 PM
Font : A-A+

 Salt-To Add or Not To?

One of the most important steps noted today to prevent hypertension and heart disease is 'Eat less salt'.

Too much salt in the diet - and specifically sodium - is widely acknowledged as a major risk factor for high blood pressure however, scientists have found that salt's other oft-overlooked constituent chloride might also play an important role.

Advertisement

A study by researchers at the University of Glasgow has revealed that low chloride levels in the blood is an independent indicator of mortality risk in people with hypertension.

The role of chloride in hypertension has received little attention from scientists hitherto.

After analysing data from almost 13,000 patients with high blood pressure, followed up over 35 years, the researchers found that low levels of chloride was associated with a higher risk of death and cardiovascular disease.
Advertisement

The group with the lowest level of chloride in their blood had a 20% higher mortality rate compared to the other subjects. The results are published in the journal Hypertension.

Dr Sandosh Padmanabhan of the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, said: "Sodium is cast as the villain for the central role it plays in increasing the risk of high blood pressure, with chloride little more than a silent extra in the background."

"However, our study has put the spotlight on this under-studied chemical to reveal an association between low levels of chloride serum in the blood and a higher mortality rate, and surprisingly this is in the opposite direction to the risks associated with high sodium."

"It is likely that chloride plays an important part in the physiology of the body and we need to investigate this further."

Chloride is already measured as part of routine clinical screening and so monitoring of chloride levels could easily be incorporated into clinical practice to identify individuals at high risk.

Dr Padmanabhan added: "The results we see from this study are confounding against the knowledge that excess salt is a bad thing, yet higher levels of chloride in the blood seems to be an independent factor that is associated with lower mortality and cardiovascular risk." We seem to have entered a grey area here that requires further investigation.

"It is too early to draw any conclusions about relating this finding to salt intake and diet. We need more research to establish exactly what the relationship between chloride and health risk is."



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Top 7 Benefits of Good Oral Hygiene
Healthy and Safer Thanksgiving 2021
Long-Term Glycemic Control - A Better Measure of COVID-19 Severity
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Amoebic Dysentery 

Recommended Reading
Obesity and High Salt Consumption Linked to High Blood Pressure Rates Among Kids
Rising obesity rates and salt content in food items has led to increasing blood pressure rates....
High-Tech Gadgets can be Produced on the Cheap Thanks to Common Salt
Common salt could be the answer of producing low cost high-tech gadgets after researchers found ......
Take Froyo’s Health Claims With a Pinch of Salt
A thorough investigation by consumer watchdog Choice has revealed that many frozen yoghurt (froyo) ....
Amoebic Dysentery
Amoebic dysentery or amoebiasis is an infection of the intestine that causes diarrhoea most frequent...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use