About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Mapping Group Bacteria Communication to Explain Antibiotic Resistance

by Thilaka Ravi on April 28, 2018 at 8:52 PM
Font : A-A+

Mapping Group Bacteria Communication to Explain Antibiotic Resistance

A group of researchers exploring the behavior of bacteria communicating within a group have found that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathogen that causes pneumonia, sepsis and other infections, communicates distress signals within a group of bacteria in response to certain antibiotics.

In a new study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC), researchers from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found that the communication varied across the colony and suggests that this bacterium may develop protective behaviors that contribute to its ability to tolerate some antibiotics.

Advertisement


"There is a general lack of understanding about how communities of bacteria, like the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa, respond to antibiotics," said Nydia Morales-Soto, senior research scientist in civil and environmental engineering and earth sciences (CEEES) at the University of Notre Dame and lead author of the paper. "Most of what we know is from studies about stationary biofilm communities, whereas less is known about the process beforehand when bacteria are colonizing, spreading and growing. In this study, our research team specifically reviewed the behavior of bacteria during this period and what that may mean for antibiotic resistance."

The reported behavior was caused by tobramycin, an antibiotic commonly used in clinical settings, and resulted in a dual signal response. As this antibiotic was applied to a colony of P. aeruginosa, the bacteria produced a signal to a localized area of the colony -- a Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) that is known to occur -- as well as a second, community-wide response, known as the alkyl hydroxyquinoline (AQNO).
Advertisement

The team mapped production of each response spatially, and determined that P. aeruginosa is capable of producing PQS in small pockets at significantly higher concentrations than previously recorded. These findings helped secure the paper's selection as a JBC "Editor's Pick," a recognition only given to the top 2 percent of manuscripts published in the journal for a given year.

The study showed that PQS and AQNO are independently regulated responses that are intentionally communicating different messages. Additionally, this means the bacteria type may have some capability to protect the colony from some external toxins while the bacteria are still in a colonizing phase.

"Although the AQNO response identified in the paper is a stress-dependent behavior, it is such a new chemical message that it has not yet been definitively labeled as a signal. Although, based on our findings, we believe it is," said Joshua Shrout, associate professor of CEEES and concurrent associate professor of biological sciences at the University of Notre Dame and co-author of the paper. "Regardless, this work opens a new window into understanding P. aeruginosa behavior and potentially how this bacterium promotes tolerance to antibiotics."

The study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, was able to identify a unique bacterial behavioral response because of the team's distinctive research method. The group utilized both Raman spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to complete a deliberate analysis, pixel by pixel, from hundreds of thousands of pixels in their chemical images. This detailed process is what allowed the researchers to identify the two distinct chemical responses of the bacteria to tobramycin, which can be otherwise easily missed. The method is also a unique process developed by this specific team of researchers.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Fermented Skin Care
Television Binge-Watching May Boost the Risk of Deadly Blood Clots
Western Diet may Augment the Risk of Autoimmune Diseases
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Shigellosis MRSA - The Super Bug Drug Resistance - Antibiotic Resistance Food Safety for Health Antibiotics Eye Infections Natural Antibiotics to Fight Bacterial Infections Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Boils - Treatment by Drugs Multiple Drug Allergy Syndrome 

Recommended Reading
Drug Resistance - Antibiotic Resistance
Drug resistance is often a problem in malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, sexually transmitted diseases and ...
A Way To Reverse Antibiotic Resistance Discovered
Resistance to antibiotics may be reversed by developing chemicals to inhibit beta-lactamase ......
How to Combat ‘Superbug’ Antibiotic Resistance?
Antibiotic resistance is an emerging global health threat. New clues have been identified to ......
Breakthrough: New Drug Identified to Combat Antibiotic Resistance
Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. A newly designed drug may ......
Antibiotics
Antibiotics are among the most used and abused medications. This article explains some general featu...
Boils - Treatment by Drugs
Diabetes patients have reduced immunity, which makes them more susceptible to skin infections like b...
Eye Infections
Eye infection is a common problem that often causes pain and discomfort to the eyes. Common symptoms...
MRSA - The Super Bug
MRSA infection is the most dreaded hospital or community acquired infection that can become ......
Multiple Drug Allergy Syndrome
Multiple drug allergy syndrome or multiple drug hypersensitivity syndrome is a condition that causes...
Natural Antibiotics to Fight Bacterial Infections
Fighting infections the natural way and preventing them is always more effective than consuming medi...
Shigellosis
Shigellosis or Bacillary Dysentery is a common cause of gastro-enteritis worldwide and can cause blo...
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE)
Enterococci are a group of gram-negative bacteria that mostly inhabit the human gut. At present ther...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
ASK A DOCTOR ONLINE
I have read and I do accept terms of use - Telemedicine

Advantage Medindia: FREE subscription for 'Personalised Health & Wellness website with consultation' (Value Rs.300/-)