Impact of Social Media on Health-related Behaviors of Teens

by Chrisy Ngilneii on  January 25, 2018 at 7:04 PM Research News
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The health-related behaviors and knowledge of teenagers are influenced by what they find and share on social media.
Impact of Social Media on Health-related Behaviors of Teens
Impact of Social Media on Health-related Behaviors of Teens

New evidence on young people's engagement with social media and the influences they reported on their health-related behavior have been reported by recent research published in the journal Sport, Education and Society.

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Analyzing 1,300 responses from teenagers aged 13 to 18 from ten UK schools, researchers set out to discover how young people engaged with health-related social media, and understand the influence this had on their behaviors and knowledge about health.

They discovered that most teenagers would 'swipe past' health-related content that was not relevant to them, such as 'suggested' or 'recommended' content, deeming it inappropriate for their age group.

Many were also highly critical of celebrity-endorsed content, with one participant referring to the celebrity lifestyle as 'a certain lifestyle that we are not living', because they were more likely to be 'having surgery' than working out in the gym.

However, many participants still found it difficult to distinguish between celebrity-endorsed content and that posted by sportsmen and women, leaving them vulnerable to celebrity influence.

The pressure of peers' 'selfies', which often strived for perfection, and the complex social implications of 'liking' each other's posts, were recurring themes in the young people's responses. Both of these activities had the potential to alter teenagers' health-related behaviors.

Lead author Dr Victoria Goodyear, of the University of Birmingham, emphasized the need to be more aware of both the positive and negative impacts social media can have upon young people. She said: "We know that many schools, teachers and parents/guardians are concerned about the health-related risks of social media on young people.

"But, contrary to popular opinion, the data from our study show that not all young people are at risk from harmful health-related impacts. Many young people are critical of the potentially damaging information that is available."

Despite teenagers' ability to assess content, the study emphasizes that adults still have a crucial role to play in supporting young people, and helping them to understand how harmful health-related information might reach them.

Professor Kathleen Armour, the University of Birmingham's Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Education, adds: "It is important to be aware that teenagers can tip quickly from being able to deal competently with the pressures of social media to being overwhelmed.

"If they are vulnerable for any reason, the sheer scale and intensity of social media can exacerbate the 'normal' challenges of adolescence. Adult vigilance and understanding are, therefore, vital."

Dr Goodyear suggests that adults should not ban or prevent young people's uses of social media, given that it provides significant learning opportunities. Instead, schools and parents/guardians should focus on young people's experiences with social media, helping them to think critically about the relevance of what they encounter, and understand both the positive and harmful effects this information could have.

Crucially, these discussions must be introduced into the classroom to help address the current gap which exists between the ways in which young people and adults understand social media.

Source: Eurekalert

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