Decaffeinated Coffee Might Protect Against Adult Onset Of Diabetes

by Medindia Content Team on  July 5, 2006 at 11:09 AM Diabetes News
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Decaffeinated Coffee Might Protect Against Adult Onset Of Diabetes
According to a study, coffee, especially decaffeinated could offer protection against the late, or adult onset of diabetes.

The report on the study that was conducted by the University of Minnesota has explained that they have no definite clue as to what might be causing the apparent effect, but they said, that it could be possible that minerals and non-nutritive plant chemicals, which are found in rich amounts in the coffee bean may be effecting favourably the blood-sugar levels or protecting the pancreas from stress.

The researchers, who had published their study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, had based the study on more than 28,000 post-menopausal women in Iowa over a period of 11 years. It was reported that at the time of starting the study among the women in Iowa, more than 14,000 of them almost about half drank one to three cups of coffee per day, with 2,875 of them drinking more than six cups, 5,554 claimed to drink four to five cups, and 3,231 of them drank less than one cup while 2,928 reported not drinking coffee.

In the 11 years that the study was conducted, around 1,418 women had reported on surveys that they had been newly diagnosed with type II diabetes. It was found that the women who drank more than six cups of any type of coffee per day were 22% less likely to be diagnosed with diabetes than those who drank no coffee at all. The study further showed that those who drank more than six cups of decaffeinated coffee daily had a 33% reduction in risk of acquiring diabetes when compared with those who drank no coffee at all.

The researchers in their report had but also explained that it is probably that something other than caffeine is at work, their study was not equipped to explore causes. Previous studies are mixed on whether caffeine increases or lessens diabetes risk among adults. Another study that was done at University of Toronto asserts that coffee drinkers are exposed to the risk of heart attack.


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