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Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome / Polycystic ovary disease

Written by Dr. D. Sunitha, MBBS | Medically Reviewed by Dr. Sunil Shroff, MBBS, MS, FRCS (UK), D. Urol (Lond) on Mar 03, 2022
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Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome - Overview

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most common hormonal disorder among women of reproductive age and can cause infertility.

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Nomenclature:

Polycystic ovary disease

Functional ovarian hyperandrogenism

Hyperandrogenic chronic anovulation

Ovarian dysmetabolic syndrome

Polycystic ovarian syndrome

Stein-Leventhal syndrome

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most common hormonal disorder among young women and a leading cause of infertility. Its exact cause is unknown.

"The physician should no longer regard these women as merely having annoying cosmetic complaints, or only suffering from infertility, but as having potential metabolic disorders that may be associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events," comments Rhoda H. Cobin, MD, FACE, Chair of the PCOS Task Force.

The syndrome was originally reported by Stein and Leventhal in 1935 when they described a group of women with absence of menstrual periods (amenorrhea), infertility, hirsutism (unwanted hair growth in women), and enlarged polycystic ovaries.

Opposition Defiant Disorder Treatment Involves Individual and Family Therapy

In this condition, the ovaries and adrenal glands produce more testosterone and less estrogen and progesterone than normal. This imbalance causes many of the symptoms of the disease.

Follicles of the ovary are the basic unit of female reproductive biology. They are usually round and contain a single egg (also called ovum). Normal ovarian volume in the menstruating females is 5-15 mL, with an approximate mean of 10 mL.

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In polycystic ovary disease, the ovaries are enlarged, with a thick, scarred capsule associated with an abnormally high number of follicles in the ovaries. This gives the impression of multiple cysts and hence the term ‘polycystic’. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than two centimeters, is called an ovarian cyst. Cyst is a closed hollow sac that usually contain air, fluids, or semi-solid material.

The follicles in polycystic ovaries may concurrently exist in varying states of growth, maturation, or degeneration.

What is new in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome / Polycystic ovary disease?

1. Liver Disease- Major Risk for Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Increasing level of male hormone which is responsible for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women may also lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, finds a new study. Women who have PCOS are two to three times more likely to develop the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease than women without PCOS.

References:

  1. Current Perspectives in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - (http://www.aafp.org/afp/20030815/697.html)
  2. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: It's Not Just Infertility - (http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000901/1079.html)
  3. Imaging in Polycystic Ovary Disease - (http://www.emedicine.com/radio/topic565.htm)

Latest Publications and Research on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

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Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.

Comments

Nida21

I am suffering from PCOD since I was 15 years. I have been taking 'krimpson 35' medicine as prescribed by the doctor. Its been 5 years and I have to take the medicine daily for getting my periods regular. Will I be dependent on medicine all through my life? Does it have any side effect?

c7e4k6h2

I've been dealing with this for over 15 yrs, and yes, you can have kids-I have 2. If you get hold of a GP who won't take it seriously, find another one. I use is 1500mg daily Metformin, 2 iron supplements [Metformin can make you have mal-absorption] daily and a b12 shot monthly, (metformin stops b12 absorption in some cases too). After years of struggle with eating disorders that hospitalized me and almost ruined my health and mental well being, I am at normal weight with moderate diet and excerise regimes. the right drug regime is key, don't let them tell you do nothing until you want to be pregnant or prescribe birth control. Take it seriously- it is easily managed but it is a condition.

c7e4k6h2

I've been dealing with this for over 15 yrs, so I can say, even in extremes, yes, you can have kids. I have 2. If you get hold of a GP who won't take it seriously, find another one. the treatment I use is 1500mg daily [1 at meal times] Metformin, 2 iron supplements (Metformin can make you v tired from malabsorption of iron) daily and a b12 shot monthly, (metformin stops b12 absorption in some cases too). these few hiccups have been nothing compared to what I gained. After years of struggle with eating disorders that hospitalized me and almost ruined my health and mental well being, I am able to maintain a normal weight with moderate diet and excerise regimes. the right drug regime is key, don't let them tell you do nothing until you want to be pregnant or prescribe birth control. There are so many things we know now that this can affect, hormones, depression, kidneys, pancreas, heart. Take it seriously- it is easily managed but it is a condition. Best of luck-

PriyankaR

me too suffering from PCOD from the time i started having periods at the age of 13.now i am 25.will i be able to get pregnant?

Confused34

I was diagnosed with PCOS the gyn says I have nothing to worry about unless I want to get pregnant or worry about getting facial hair. I am not receiving treatment because he said it wasn't serious. Now I am worried he was wrong

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