Oligoarthritis - Children And Arthritis

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Children And Arthritis

Arthritis is a collective term that represents more than 100 different conditions that share certain common features such as pain, inflammation (swelling), stiffness and loss of function of joints. About 1 in every 1000 children develop arthritis.

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This form of arthritis that occurs in children is called juvenile arthritis. The age of diagnosis ranges from time of birth to 16 years of age.

The definite cause of arthritis is unknown and it has not been possible to pinpoint any lifestyle activities or microorganism for the disease. The inheritance of specific genes is believed to increase the risk of arthritis in children. More research is clearly indicated to identify the cause for arthritis in children. Previously, all children with the diagnosis of arthritis were classified into one single class called juvenile idiopathic (due to unidentified cause) arthritis. This categorization is no longer valid as there are different forms of arthritis in children. Eight different subtypes of arthritis exist.

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Just found information on this subject on another site: - Via Lana, Patient Advocate at ArthritisConnect: "Arthritis literally means inflammation of one or more joints. Pauciarticular juvenile arthritis works somewhat in that manner. Pauciarticular means "few joints." This means that the pauciarticular type of juvenile arthritis involves only a few joints. About half of children with juvenile arthritis have the pauciarticular type. For half of the children with pauciarticular juvenile arthritis, only one joint will be involved, usually a knee or ankle. This is called monoarticular juvenile arthritis. These patients usually have a very mild arthritis and the symptoms may go away or become less noticeable [remit]. In adults acute monoarthritis overlaps with causes of oligoarthritis or polyarthritis since virtually any arthritic disorder can initially present as one swollen joint. Causes of Monoarticular arthritis can be as simple as an overuse injury or fracture to gout, lyme disease, or septic arthritis (bacterial, fungal, or parasitic). And gout does not always just affect the big toe. Moreover, in rheumatoid arthritis, some of the earliest signs of the disease are in the hands and fingers. With RA, the smallest joints, toes and fingers are affected first. So if three months have passed and the pain is there, then more tests are needed to find out what is going on."

When I was 6 or 7, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis was mentioned once when I was taken to the emergency room with joint pain; but was never officially diagnosed. When I was younger, the problem was limited to my knees and ankles. As I got older the pain has increased to my hips, back, shoulders, basically all over. I've always treated it with heat and ibuprofen. I am glad to see that there is finally a diagnosis that fits: Oligoarthritis. Working out helps quite a bit [I have to work through the pain].

Most of the time that a child has arthritis it is either Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis or osteoarthritis caused by a trauma to a joint. An infection can also cause arthritis in a joint but it will usually disappear when the infection is treated. Also rarely other forms of autoimmune diseases can cause arthritis in children.

Elaine73

I was 13 years of age when I experienced severe joint pain: the worst was the joint I sat on in class or in a vehicle (one hour trip was excruciatingly painful). Next it was my knees, then shoulders and wrists. The joints were swollen, red and hot to touch. The pain lasted off & on for about 4 or 5 years, then subsided for about 25 years. It started again at about age 45. Now I am 73 and have osteoarthritis in my spine and knees. Is there any help for me, other than just pain killers such as Tylenol?

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