About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Z Sleeping Drugs in Dementia Not Safe

by Karishma Abhishek on November 24, 2020 at 10:47 PM
Font : A-A+

Z Sleeping Drugs in Dementia Not Safe

Higher risk of falls, fractures, and strokes are associated with usage of Z sleeping drugs among people with dementia, as per research from the University of East Anglia.

Dementia is characterized by a decline in memory and cognition, affecting behavior and activities of daily life. Sleeping issues are commonly seen in 90% of dementia patients, affecting their mental and physical health and also of their caregivers.

Advertisement


Z-drugs (e.g. Zopiclone, Zaleplon, and Zolpidem) are a class of sleeping pills - Nonbenzodiazepines known to treat insomnia. It is recommended for only short-term use (maximum of four weeks) in people with dementia.

Though the efficacy of these drugs is unclear, dementia patients are often prescribed high doses of Z-drugs This is associated with a greater adverse effect as seen with benzodiazepines or 'benzos' - a stronger class of sedative drugs, except for a lower mortality rate with Z-drugs.
Advertisement

Z-drugs among Dementia Patients:

To analyze the effects of these drugs and their dosage in dementia, the research team employed data from 27,090 dementia patients of average age 83 years in England, between January 2000 and March 2016. Among them 62% were women.

Adverse events of Z-drugs - fractures, falls, deep vein thrombosis, stroke, and death were monitored in 3,532 patients over two years. Data were compared to people with sleeping disturbances, who were not on any sedatives, and those who had been on prescribed benzodiazepines.

"For patients prescribed Z-drugs, 17 percent were given higher doses. And we found that these patients on higher doses were more at risk of falls and fractures, particularly hip fractures, and stroke - compared with patients who were not taking any medication for sleep disturbance", said Prof Chris Fox, from UEA's Norwich Medical School. "Patients already taking higher dose Z-drugs should not stop taking their medication, but we recommend that they should make an appointment to see their GP for a review", he added.

The study offers insights to avoid usage of long-term higher doses of sleeping pills in dementia patients. This urges the need to develop non-drug approaches for these patients to tackle sleep issues and social isolation during Covid-19.

Source: Medindia
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Black Pepper as Preventive Measure Against Omicron
FODMAP Diet: A Beginner's Guide
Smallpox
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Alzheimers Disease Drug Toxicity Drugs Banned in India Sleeping Scale Dementia Vascular Dementia 

Recommended Reading
Can Worrying Too Much Cause Alzheimer's Disease?
Anxiety is associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease progression....
Quiz on Sleep Disorder
The comfort of modern life comes at the cost of restful sleep! "Laugh and the world laughs with ......
Tau Protein Unfolds Novel Biomarkers & Therapeutics for Alzheimer’s Disease
The pathological accumulation of tau proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD) unfolds its dynamic ......
Does Visual Illusion Explain Enigmatic Human Behavior?
Convolutional neural networks (CNN), an analog to the human visual cortex, are found to be deceived ...
Alzheimers Disease
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting memory and thinking and mak...
Dementia
Dementia has become a very big concern as we have an aging population across the world. Dementia is ...
Drug Toxicity
Drug toxicity is an adverse reaction of the body towards a drug that results as a side effect of a d...
Drugs Banned in India
Several drugs are either banned or withdrawn after introduction in the market....
Vascular Dementia
Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia. Though it has no cure, you can still l...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use