About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Young Men More At Risk of Distracted Driving

by Hannah Joy on November 27, 2017 at 6:59 PM
Font : A-A+

Young Men More At Risk of Distracted Driving

Young men who are extroverted or neurotic people are often found to be more at risk of distracted driving and can be predicted by age, gender, personality and driving frequency. However, older women were found to control their distracted behavior, reveals a new study.

The study was published in Frontiers in Psychology, this is the first study of how personal traits affect driver distraction. The study also proposes future directions for interventions to reduce distracted driving.

Advertisement


The World Health Organization estimates that more than 1 million people are killed in road traffic accidents each year. Driver distractions, including answering the phone or fiddling with the radio, are a factor in many accidents.

The risk of being involved in an accident increases dramatically after just two seconds of distraction so understanding and reducing driver distraction will help to save lives.
Advertisement

Predicting and explaining distracted behavior is difficult, as people often don't intend to reduce their focus on driving, and may feel they have little control over it.

Researchers have not previously examined the link between someone's attitudes and intentions regarding distracted driving and how often they are distracted during driving.

In addition, the link between distracted driving and gender, age and personality, is not completely understood.

Ole Johansson, a researcher at the Institute of Transport Economics in Norway, investigated these issues by surveying a large group of Norwegian high-school students and a group of Norwegian adults.

The surveys covered a variety of topics, including the frequency and type of distractions the participants experience during driving, their attitudes and intentions around driver distractions, and their personalities.

The surveys revealed that overall rates of driver distraction were low and that fiddling with the radio was the most common distractor. However, some of the most prominent predictors of distraction were age and gender.

"I found that young men were among the most likely to report distraction," says Johansson. "Others more prone to distraction include those who drive often, and those with neurotic and extroverted personalities."

People who felt that distracted driving was more socially acceptable, or that it was largely beyond their control, were also more likely to report distracted driving. However, older women and those who felt that they could control their distractive behavior were less likely to report distraction.

The study also examined the effectiveness of an intervention to reduce distracted driving. Participants chose plans to reduce their distractive behavior by matching "if" statements such as "if I am tempted to drive faster than the speed limit while on the highway" with "then" statements such as "then I will remind myself that it is dangerous and illegal to do so".

A control group was provided with information about driving distractions, but made no plans. A follow-up survey two weeks later measured driver distraction in the two groups.

Both the intervention group and the control group showed a similar decline in distracted driving, meaning that the intervention itself was not effective. Simply being exposed to material about distracted driving and completing the survey may have been enough for the participants to become more aware of their distractions.

Johansson believes one key to successful future interventions lies in allowing the participants to devise their own plans, rather than choosing from a list, so that they are more engaged. Interventions could also focus on the needs of high-risk groups.

"Tailored interventions to reduce driver distraction could focus on at-risk groups, such as young males with bad attitudes to distracted driving and a low belief that they can control their distraction," he concludes.



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Memory Loss - Can it be Recovered?
International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2021 - Fighting for Rights in the Post-COVID Era
Effect of Blood Group Type on COVID-19 Risk and Severity
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Alcohol and Driving Women More Prone to Road Rage 

Recommended Reading
Chimeric Gene the Driving Factor for Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Study identifies the fusion of two genes called the chimeric to be driving genetic factor for ......
Survey Finds Increase In Aggressive Driving Around Winter Holidays
Nearly two out of three (64 percent) U.S. drivers have experienced an act of aggressive driving six ...
Driving for More Than an Hour a Day can Increase Your Waistline
The time spent driving each day is associated with waist circumference, body mass index, ......
Smartphones are Driving Teenagers Away from Drugs
The use of marijuana is down over the past decade for eighth and 10th graders even as social ......
Alcohol and Driving
Alcohol and driving do not mix. Drunken driving is the cause of many deaths in the world....
Women More Prone to Road Rage
If you find your self getting mad and cursing under your breath while driving, you are a victim of r...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use