About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

With Proper Care, Even Logged Rainforests Can Support Biodiversity

by Tanya Thomas on October 24, 2009 at 8:40 AM
Font : A-A+

 With Proper Care, Even Logged Rainforests Can Support Biodiversity

If properly managed, logged rainforests can support as much plant, animal and insect life as virgin forest within 15 years. These results were found after much research by experts at the University of Leeds, UK

Because trees in tropical climates soak up large amounts of carbon dioxide, restoring logged forest through planting new trees could also be used in carbon trading, according to Dr David Edwards, from University's Faculty of Biological Sciences.

Advertisement

Dr Edwards is calling for the inclusion of biodiversity-friendly strategies in carbon trading schemes to ensure that carbon off-setting projects support, rather than undermine, rainforest conservation.

Currently, large plantations of one type of tree, such as Eucalpytus, are popular as carbon off-setting or sequestration projects in the tropics because they also provide commercial benefits, but they do not support tropical biodiversity.
Advertisement

But, Dr Edwards has shown that managed restoration of logged forest, which can also be used for carbon off-setting, brings biodiversity virtually back to pre-logging levels within 15 years, much quicker than forest left to regenerate naturally.

"Our research shows that it is possible to have both carbon sequestration and biodiversity benefits within the same scheme," he said.

"This could act as a strong incentive to protect logged forests under threat of deforestation for oil palm and other such crops. Selectively logged rainforests are often vulnerable because they're seen as degraded, but we've shown they can support similar levels of biodiversity to unlogged forests," he added.

The research compared biodiversity of birds in three adjoining areas of tropical forest in the north-east of Borneo.

One is the oldest and largest area of rehabilitated forest in the tropics, logged around 20 years ago and with over 10,000 ha actively rehabilitated for the past fifteen; another is a naturally regenerating area of forest, logged at the same time; and the third, a conservation area of unlogged forest.

The findings showed that the number and range of species of birds in rehabilitated tropical forest recovered to levels very close to those found in unlogged forest after just 15 years.

Forest that was left to regenerate naturally after selective logging showed less diversity.

"There are now suggestions that carbon crediting and 'biodiversity banking' should be combined, enabling extra credits for projects that offer a biodiversity benefit," said Dr Edwards.

"We believe this should be introduced as soon as possible, to ensure maximum support for rehabilitation schemes in the tropical rainforest," he added.

Source: ANI
TAN
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Alarming Cesarean Section Trends in India - Convenience or Compulsion of Corporate Healthcare
Quiz on Low-Calorie Diet for Diabetes
World Heart Day in 2022- Use Heart for Every Heart
View all
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Most Popular on Medindia

Find a Hospital Diaphragmatic Hernia Post-Nasal Drip Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Vent Forte (Theophylline) Blood Pressure Calculator Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Hearing Loss Calculator
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

With Proper Care, Even Logged Rainforests Can Support Biodiversity Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests