Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Medindia
Advertisement

Vitamin D Not Related to Overall Cancer Deaths

by Medindia Content Team on October 31, 2007 at 2:16 PM
Vitamin D Not Related to Overall Cancer Deaths

A study published online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute reports no significant association between vitamin D levels and the overall risk of dying from cancer. However, higher vitamin D levels were associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer death.

Several epidemiological studies have supported the hypothesis that that vitamin D can reduce cancer mortality by decreasing cancer incidence or improving survival. Animal and cell studies suggest that vitamin D may reduce tumor growth and induce cancer cell death. Diet and exposure to sunlight are the major sources of vitamin D.

Advertisement

D. Michal Freedman, Ph.D., of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues analyzed data from the third national Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to examine the relationship between levels of circulating vitamin D in the blood and cancer mortality in a group of 16,818 participants aged 17 and older.

After about a decade of follow-up, 536 participants had died of cancer. Cancer mortality was not related to the level of circulating vitamin D for the overall group, nor was it related when the researchers looked at the data by sex, race, or age. But higher levels of vitamin D (80 nmol/L or more) were associated with a 72 percent reduced risk of colorectal cancer mortality, compared with lower levels (less than 50 nmol/L).
Advertisement

"To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine the relationship between measured serum vitamin D levels and cancer mortality for selected site and for all sites combined," the authors write.

In an accompanying editorial, Cindy Davis, Ph.D., and Johanna Dwyer, D.Sc. of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., discuss the complicated relationship between nutrients, like vitamin D, and cancer. They suggest that not enough is known about the benefits and limitations of vitamin D to use it for the prevention of disease or death.

"These findings must be put into the context of total diet and lifestyle. There are many risk factors other than diet for colorectal cancer, and there are many possible dietary risk factors other than vitamin D that have been linked to cancer risk," the editorialists write.

Source: Eurekalert
GAN/V
Font : A-A+

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Readings

Latest Cancer News

New Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer
The effects and mechanisms of microRNA-451a (miR-451a), which hinders the progression of gemcitabine-resistant biliary tract cancers, are under study.
Blood Test for Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer
The blood test pinpointed 13 proteins capable of distinguishing between early and late stages of pancreatic cancer.
Nutrients in Beef and Dairy Promote Cancer Immunotherapy
A fatty acid present in dairy products, beef, and lamb called trans-vaccenic acid enhances immune cells' capacity to combat cancers.
Combination Therapy Holds Promise for Brain Tumor in Children
Trametinib plus dabrafenib combined therapy demonstrated a clear therapeutic benefit in children with BRAF-mutated low- and high-grade gliomas.
Urban Environments Fuel Higher Breast Cancer Rates
Examining breast cancer occurrence and stages reveals disparities in urban versus rural rates, influenced by environmental conditions and the stage of the disease.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Vitamin D Not Related to Overall Cancer Deaths Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests