About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Clinton’s Nutrition Deal Cuts Junk Food on School Menus

by Medindia Content Team on October 9, 2006 at 3:05 PM
Font : A-A+

Clinton’s Nutrition Deal Cuts Junk Food on School Menus

Clinton's Nutrition Deal with five giant snack makers has come to an agreement to discourage schools from stocking vending machines with snacks high in calories, sugar fat, and salt. While lauded by some as a good effort, others criticized it as toothless.

The companies, , Mars Inc., Kraft Foods Inc., Campbell Soup Co., PepsiCo Inc. and Dannon agreed to begin the promotion of snacks that meet new nutrition guidelines backed by the American Heart Association.

Advertisement

As Clinton acknowledged, ``This is voluntary, they don't have to do it,'' speaking of the companies and the schools. ``But they recognize the challenge we face and they are helping us take the first step.''

Certain the companies that make everything from M&M's, yogurt and granola bars to Frito-Lay potato chips would have to reformulate some products or introduce new lines of healthier snacks for children.
Advertisement

Others will be urging schools to buy healthy, rather than cater to student cravings.

Some of the items that are to be banned are fatty, extra-salty soups, calorie-ladden candy bars, and any other snack that contains trans fats. Low-fat chips (baked, not fried) and low-sugar yogurts will be in.

Clinton announced this initiative in a high school gymnasium in Harlem but admitted that plan's success would mainly depend on the participation of schools, which will continue to be free to buy whatever they like.

However he opined that the nation's childhood obesity epidemic and rising health care costs made immediate action essential.

Janey Thornton, president of the School Nutrition Association and a child nutrition director in Kentucky, commended the program but warned that it should not be seen as a substitute for federal legislation enacting stronger health standards for school food.

She said, ``It has to have some enforcement behind it. We have some pretty strict regulations here in Kentucky, but some states have none, and that's where I think the problem comes in.''

According to the food guidelines set under the agreement snacks marketed to schools wouldn't get more than 35 percent of their calories from fat and more than 10 percent from saturated fat. There will be a limit of 35 percent for sugar content by weight.

This would translate into a ban on the regular-sized Snickers bar for students in participating schools, because 130 of its 280 calories come from fat, and contains 30 grams of sugar, out of 58.7 total.

The agreement was the product of the work by the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, which is a project of the William J. Clinton Foundation and the American Heart Association.

In May, the alliance announced an agreement with beverage industry leaders to sell only water, unsweetened juice and low-fat and nonfat milk in elementary and middle schools.

The challenge the group is facing is a problem which arose in the mid-1980s, when financially struggling schools across the country invited private vendors, offering a wider variety of foods causing many millions of students satisfy their hunger and thirst with chips and soda, rather than what was on the school lunch menu.

Make healthy food alluring enough to win over those kids might be a tough task.



Source: Medindia
NLA
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Black Pepper as Preventive Measure Against Omicron
FODMAP Diet: A Beginner's Guide
Smallpox
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
The Cabbage Diet Processed Foods Zone Diet The Macrobiotic Diet Food Additives Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Lifestyle Modification: No Big Deal! Healthy Living Hunger Fullness and Weight Control 
Recommended Reading
Food Additives
A food additive is a non-nutritive substance added deliberately to any food product to improve its c...
Hunger Fullness and Weight Control
An erratic way of eating or any metabolic disturbance in the hunger fullness signals is one of the m...
Lifestyle Modification: No Big Deal!
Simple and practically possible lifestyle changes can make a huge difference in improving our health...
Processed Foods
Processed or convenience foods require less time and energy for food preparation. Most of the proces...
The Cabbage Diet
The plausible reason that can be sited is the inherent low calorie property of cabbage....
Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts
The importance of eating food and the physiological, psychological and social functions of food....
Zone Diet
The Zone Diet is a weight loss program with a ‘40:30:30’ plan for carbohydrates, fats and proteins ....

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use