About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

A glowing energy measure for heart cells

by Medindia Content Team on September 25, 2006 at 12:08 PM
Font : A-A+

A glowing energy measure for heart cells

A team of scientists from Bristol University has developed a technique, using luciferase, to measure energy levels in living heart cells that will aid in detecting damage to heart cells after a heart attack.

The scientists expect this technique to pave way for rapid recovery from cardiac arrests and heart surgery. This study was published in the Friday's issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Advertisement

Dr Elinor Griffiths and her team carried out a detailed investigation on cell mitochondria - the powerhouse of cells. Energy from food is converted into ATP chemical energy by mitochondria.
In order to study the working of a heart cell mitochondria, the researchers used the protein; luciferase, usually present in the tails of fireflies. Luciferase glows in the presence of ATP. Thus, the intensity of light serves as a meter to measure the amount of ATPs generated by the mitochondria.

"Exactly how mitochondria tailor the supply of ATP to demand is not fully known. But being able to directly measure cellular ATP levels should aid understanding," said Dr. Griffiths.
Advertisement

Generally, heart cells have the capacity to produce energy rapidly. But, the researchers have discovered an energy lag when the cells have to begin beating suddenly from a state of rest, like after a cardiac arrest. This pause could possibly alter the normal beating of heart and sequentially deteriorate the patient's condition.

"We know already during cardiac surgery these energy levels within the heart will drop because surgeons have to stop the heart when they operate on it. Eventually, we hope to find a way to either prevent the energy levels from dropping or enable them to recover very quickly," she said.

"Drugs are already in existence to help protect mitochondria from damage and preserve their function. If we can get those into the heart at the right time then we could protect the mitochondria and get them to produce more energy," she added.

Prof. Peter Weissberg, Medical Director of the British Heart Foundation, which funded the research, said, "This work is at the cutting edge of molecular imaging and allows scientists to follow, in real time, what is happening to the energy supply inside heart cells."

Source: Medindia
GYT
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Top 10 Foods for Decreasing DHT Production and Preventing Hair Fall
Alarming Cesarean Section Trends in India - Convenience or Compulsion of Corporate Healthcare
Quiz on Low-Calorie Diet for Diabetes
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Heart Healthy Heart Statins Mitral Valve Prolapse Aortic Valve Stenosis Pericarditis 

Most Popular on Medindia

Diaphragmatic Hernia Selfie Addiction Calculator Noscaphene (Noscapine) Vent Forte (Theophylline) Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects Blood Donation - Recipients A-Z Drug Brands in India
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

A glowing energy measure for heart cells Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests