About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Designer babies

by Gayatri on September 10, 2006 at 10:40 AM
Font : A-A+

Designer babies

According to a recent study by psychologists at the University of East Anglia, the concept of "designing" babies is notably more acceptable to the learned than the poorly educated.

Dr. Simon Hampton presented the findings at the BA Festival of Science on Setpember 5.

Advertisement

If given a chance, what would different groups of people in the UK "design into" their kids, this was studied by Dr. Hampton and his team at UEA's School of Social Work and Psychosocial Studies.

The evidence suggests that there are gender, age and socio-economic class differences in what is deemed desirable and that many prospective parents would be prepared to manipulate their babies in ways that are at odds with moral orthodoxy.
Advertisement

"People assume that the very notion of designer babies stems from the desire of prospective parents for their children to be healthy," said Dr. Hampton. "However, the picture is complicated by the shifting meaning of 'healthy' and confusion about when the manipulation of children's physical, psychological or social characteristics is legitimate, natural or ethical."

We are often presented with information and speculation about what reproductive technologies might achieve in the future and with various ethical dilemmas. This new research is among the first to investigate the thoughts and feelings of ordinary prospective parents.

The results of a series of surveys of 100-200 participants included:

· The better educated prospective parents are, the further they are prepared to go to improve their children's IQ.
· Women interpret certain interventions in child rearing as "design acts" more readily than men.
· People over 50 interpret certain interventions as "design acts" more readily than people under 25.
· Because of "parental uncertainty" - the idea than women know for certain if a child is their's whereas men do not - men show a significantly greater preference than female parents for their children to inherit their own characteristics.
· Parents see different physical, social and intellectual characteristics as desirable depending on the sex of the child.
· Older women and childless women are significantly more willing to "improve" the physical, social and intellectual characteristics of prospective children? (This can be explained by women seeking to increase their genetic heredity, particularly when their time to reproduce begins to decrease.)
· Both men and women see genetic engineering as acceptable primarily for medical applications.

Reproductive technologies and designer babies was held in ARTS 01.02 at UEA on Tuesday September 5 from 4-6pm.

Source: Eurekalert
GYT
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Test Your Knowledge About Chromosomes?
Eating During Sunlight Hours Minimizes Mood Vulnerabilities
Know More About the Digestive System
View all
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Most Popular on Medindia

Drug Interaction Checker Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Blood Donation - Recipients Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Blood Pressure Calculator Accident and Trauma Care Iron Intake Calculator Daily Calorie Requirements How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Designer babies Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests