About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Mixed response Evoked Among The Tribal Elders For The Call On Smoking Ban

by Medindia Content Team on August 14, 2006 at 12:36 PM
Font : A-A+

Mixed response Evoked Among The Tribal Elders For The Call On Smoking Ban

The call for the tribal elders to impose a smoking ban on marae, by the Maori Party has drawn a mixed response from the leaders.

Te Tai Tokerau MP Hone Harawira has advocated that the kaumatua to drive for a smoke free marae, alarmed at the unreasonably high Maori smoking rates. It has been reported that almost half of the people in Maori smoke with the rates among the women being one of the highest in the world.

Advertisement

Mr Harawira has said that too many kaumatua overlooked cigarette smoking on the marae with the belief that to ban it would dissuade young people from visiting. He said, 'Our people are great workers, but they would be even better workers who lived healthier, happier and longer if they didn't smoke.'

Stating that 'Te Rangimarie Marae' in Christchurch has became the first marae in the South Island to declare itself smoke free, Harawira said, 'I hope that kaumatua throughout the country look to Te Rangimarie for inspiration and not feel guilty about telling their young ones they can't smoke on the marae grounds.'
Advertisement

Ngapuhi chairman Sonny Tau, giving a very cautious support for the call of banning smoking has said that most Northland marae were smoke free. But cautioned that any moves to ban smoking should involve all marae members. He said, 'The call must be made with caution, with an end result of working towards it rather than just implementing it. I support his korero, because of the high smoking statistics among Maori.'

Willie Jackson, the spokesman for Nga Whare Waatea Marae in Mangere, had said that even though he would support the initiatives to end the high rates of smoking in Maori, he was opposed to it being issued as a directive from the politicians. He was quoted as saying; 'Hone has taken a hard, and probably the right, line. However reality must kick in, you have to respect people's rights.' He further explained that as many marae workers and elders smoked and it would not be right to expect them to go out to the road to smoke.

Hemi Rau the Tainui chief executive had said that many Tainui marae were smoke and alcohol free. He said, 'While tribal leaders can give an indication, at the end of the day it is up to each marae committee to make the final call.' It has been reported that among Auckland's three main marae, Orakei, Waatea and West Auckland's Hoani Waititi Marae, only the last is smoke free. Mr. Harawira has launched a campaign that targets tobacco companies this year and called for a ban on all cigarettes.

The Smoke free Environments Amendment Bill that was passed in 2003 has banned smoking in schools, bars and other workplaces.

Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Test Your Knowledge on Lung Transplantation
Baldness can be Cured and Prevented: let us see How!
Drinking Beer or Wine Every Day Could Cause Age-related Diseases
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Health Hazards of Smoking Smoking And Cancer Smoking And Tobacco Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Bubbles and Brews - Alcohol Facts Smoking Cigarette Smoking - A Silent Killer Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Leriche Syndrome Antioxidants to Help You When You Quit Smoking 

Most Popular on Medindia

Blood Pressure Calculator Drug Interaction Checker Color Blindness Calculator Indian Medical Journals Drug - Food Interactions Blood - Sugar Chart How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Find a Doctor Sanatogen Vent Forte (Theophylline)
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use