About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Treatment of Bacterial Infection Paves the Way to Treat CF Infection

by Medindia Content Team on June 10, 2006 at 3:36 PM
Font : A-A+

Treatment of Bacterial Infection Paves the Way to Treat CF Infection

According to the researchers at the Harvard Medical School it is said that a resistant bacteria was found in the lungs of chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is the bacteria which secretes proteins that cause disease in the CF patients says Joseph Mougous, lead author of the study published in the June 9 issue of Science. 'In the case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the host may be a cancer patient with a weakened immune system, a burn patient, or a person with cystic fibrosis (CF).'

Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a pathogen that infects more than 80 percent of cystic fibrosis patients, is a leading cause of these patients' death. PA is difficult to treat because it is resistant to many drugs. 'Since we know so little about what this bacterium is up to while it's engaged in these chronic infections, the discovery of this protein secretion system might lead to finding a new target for treatments,' said Mougous, a research fellow in the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics. Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provided one of the clues that contributed to the HMS discovery.

Advertisement

Working through a number of pathogenic proteins, ANL protein crystallographer Marianne Cuff saw a bagel-shaped pore that might be involved in transferring toxins into cells. She deposited the structure of the protein, called Hcp1, into the Protein Data Bank, a resource used by biologists worldwide to find information about the proteins they are studying. While exploring the Protein Data Bank, Mougous, who was studying PA in the laboratory of department chair John Mekalanos, recognized that the amino acid sequence of Hcp1 in PA closely resembled that of Hcp1 in Vibrio cholerae. The Mekalanos lab had previously discovered that the Hcp1 protein of V. cholerae is released from the bacterium via a novel secretion pathway. Because Hcp1 proteins from both pathogens belong to the same protein family, Mougous wondered whether the Pseudomonas Hcp1 might also be secreted via this pathway. The Harvard and Argonne researchers quickly formed a collaboration and confirmed the hypothesis.

They then turned their attention to Hcp1 in cystic fibrosis patients to gain more insight in the role of Hcp1 during infection. Working with cystic fibrosis patients at Children's Hospital Boston, the HMS researchers sought and found Hcp1 in the sputum of patients with P. aeruginosa. They also found Hcp1 antibodies in the patients' blood - further evidence that Hcp1 plays a critical role in the infection. The human immune system creates antibodies to pathogens it is exposed to. 'CF patients are particularly susceptible to PA,' Mougous said. 'The bacterium thrives in the excess mucus that accumulates in their lungs. Once a PA infection in a CF patient's lung has been established, these hardy bacteria are difficult or impossible to clear, which over many years eventually results in the death of the patient. Our paper provides evidence that the protein secretion system we discovered represents at least one way this bacterium could be promoting its own survival in the lungs of CF patients.' 'This finding provides a possible drug target to fight the infection in cystic fibrosis patients,' added Andzrej Joachimiak, director of Argonne's Structural Biology Center and of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics based at Argonne.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Cervical Cancer Awareness Month 2022
Ultra-Low-Fat Diet
Goji Berries May Protect Against Age-Related Vision Loss
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Flu Whipple’s Disease Actinomycosis / Lumpy Jaw Croup Impetigo Epiglottitis Bacterial Meningitis Dysuria - Symptom Evaluation Toxic Shock Syndrome Test Your Knowledge on Hand Hygiene 

Recommended Reading
Respiratory Diseases - Cystic Fibrosis
Encyclopedia section of medindia gives general info about Cystic Fibrosis...
Birth Defects - Genetic - Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic fibrosis is a progressively debilitating genetic disorder, which mainly affects the lungs ......
Actinomycosis / Lumpy Jaw
Actinomycosis is caused by a family of bacteria called Actinomycetaceae that are usually found in th...
Bacterial Meningitis
Bacterial infection that causes inflammation of the membranes of the brain, is called bacterial meni...
Croup
Croup or laryngotracheobronchitis results from the infection of the upper respiratory airway causing...
Dysuria - Symptom Evaluation
Dysuria is a symptom of pain and burning while passing urine. It is more common in women and is ofte...
Epiglottitis
Epiglottitis is a potentially life-threatening condition caused by blockage of airways due to swelli...
Impetigo
Impetigo is a contagious bacterial skin infection mostly affecting children and is characterized by ...
Toxic Shock Syndrome
Toxic shock syndrome is a rare life-threatening medical condition caused by bacterial infections....
Whipple’s Disease
Whipple’s disease is a bacterial infection that affects multiple systems like the digestive tract, b...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
CONSULT A DOCTOR
I have read and I do accept terms of use - Telemedicine

Advantage Medindia: FREE subscription for 'Personalised Health & Wellness website with consultation' (Value Rs.300/-)