Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Medindia
Advertisement

Motherís Attitude Towards Immunisation Makes it Inaccessible to Children

by Medindia Content Team on June 3, 2006 at 3:25 PM
Motherís Attitude Towards Immunisation Makes it Inaccessible to Children

A recent study stated that mothers of unimmunised children differ in their attitude with those of partially immunised in a number of ways.

This is the first large scale study of its kind in the UK, and suggests that different approaches are needed to maximise uptake of immunisation in these groups.

Advertisement

Researchers from the Institute of Child Health analysed data for 18,488 infants born between September 2000 and January 2002 in the UK. The sample was stratified by UK country and electoral wards to adequately represent infants from ethnic minority groups and disadvantaged backgrounds.

Mothers were interviewed when the infants were about 9 months old. They were shown a card listing the primary vaccines, given at 2, 3, and 4 months of age, and asked if the infants had received three doses of all listed vaccines.
Advertisement

Overall, 3.3% of infants were partially immunised and 1.1% were unimmunised. These rates were highest in England (3.6% and 1.3% respectively).

Partially immunised infants were more likely to come from an ethnic minority group, a disadvantaged background, and a large family. They were also more likely to have a teenaged or lone parent, a mother who smoked during pregnancy, and have been admitted to hospital at least once.

In contrast, unimmunised infants were more likely to have older (40 years or above) and more highly qualified mothers, or mothers of black Caribbean ethnicity.

Mothers cited medical factors relating to their child or family as the predominant reason for partial immunisation. Mothers' beliefs or attitudes towards immunisation were the main reason cited for no immunisation.

These findings indicate that mothers of unimmunised and partially immunised infants differ in terms of age and education, say the authors. 'Our study suggests that different interventions are needed to promote uptake of immunisation among older and more highly qualified mothers who reject primary immunisations,' they conclude.

(Source : Newswise)
Font : A-A+

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Latest Women Health News

Could Zinc Be the New Solution for Vaginal Yeast Infections?
New findings lead to advancements in treating vaginal yeast infections by offering fresh insights into how microbes within the body absorb zinc.
AI Tool Precisely Detects Postpartum Hemorrhage
An AI tool called Flan-T5 identified postpartum hemorrhage with 95% precision and detected 47% patients with the condition.
Active Scrutiny of Cervical Lesions Fuels Long-Term Cervical Cancer Risk
Active surveillance of cervical lesions was associated with higher cervical cancer risk in the long term compared to its removal.
Contraceptive Pills To Go Over-the-Counter Sale in Japan
Japan initiated the trial of selling morning-after contraceptive tablets over-the-counter in an effort to lower abortion rates and solace for rape victims.
Urinary Tract Infections Surge in Indian Women Due to Ignorance
The rising number of urinary tract infections (UTIs) among Indian women can be attributed primarily to social stigma and a lack of awareness.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Motherís Attitude Towards Immunisation Makes it Inaccessible to Children Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests