About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Trauma and Brain Damage Showed in 3-D Image of Paleolithic Child's Skull

by Himabindu Venkatakrishnan on July 24, 2014 at 2:53 PM
Font : A-A+

 Trauma and Brain Damage Showed in 3-D Image of Paleolithic Child's Skull

Potentially violent head trauma that likely lead to brain damage is revealed in the 3-D imaging of a Paleolithic child's skull, found in a study published published July 23, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hélène Coqueugniot and colleagues from CNRS - Université de Bordeaux and EPHE.

A Paleolithic child that lived ~100 thousand years ago found at Qafzeh in lower Galilee, Israel, was originally thought to have a skull lesion that resulted from a trauma that healed. The child died at about 12-13 years old, but the circumstances surround the child's death remain mysterious. To better understand the injury, the authors of this study aimed to re-appraise the child's impact wound using 3D imaging, which allows scientists to better to explore inner bone lesions, to evaluate their impact on soft tissues, and to estimate brain size to reconstruct the events surrounding the skull trauma.

Advertisement

3D reconstruction reveals that the child's skull fracture appears to be compound, with a broken piece depressed in the skull, surrounded by linear fractures. The authors suggest that this fracture type generally results from a blunt force trauma, often a result of interpersonal violence, but can also occur accidentally. The depressed fracture was likely caused a moderate traumatic brain injury, possibly resulting in personality changes, trouble controlling movements, and difficulty in social communication. The authors conclude that, the child represents the oldest documented human case of severe skull trauma available from south-western Asia. Furthermore, the child appears to have received special social attention after death, as the body positioning seems intentional with two deer antlers lying on the upper part of the adolescent's chest, likely suggesting a deliberate ceremonial burial.

Hélène Coqueugniot added, "Digital imaging and 3D reconstruction evidenced the oldest traumatic brain injury in a Paleolithic child. Post-traumatic neuropsychological disorders could have impaired social life of this individual who was buried, when teenager, with a special ritual raising the question of compassion in Prehistory."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
World Heart Day in 2022- Use Heart for Every Heart
Anemia among Indian Women and Children Remains a Cause of Concern- National Family Health Survey-5
H1N1 Influenza Prevention in Children: What Parents Need to Know
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Coma Parkinsons Disease Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Trauma Care Brain Brain Facts Ataxia Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Christianson Syndrome Language Areas in The Brain 

Most Popular on Medindia

Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Find a Hospital Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Hearing Loss Calculator Find a Doctor Accident and Trauma Care Indian Medical Journals Vent Forte (Theophylline) Post-Nasal Drip
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Trauma and Brain Damage Showed in 3-D Image of Paleolithic Child's Skull Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests