Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Medindia
Advertisement

Teen Girls Less Successful at Quitting Meth Drug During Treatment Than Boys: Study

by Thilaka Ravi on May 1, 2013 at 8:56 PM
Teen Girls Less Successful at Quitting Meth Drug During Treatment Than Boys: Study

A UCLA-led study of adolescents receiving treatment for methamphetamine dependence has found that girls are less successful in giving up the drug and likely to continue using the drug during treatment than boys, prompting the need for new approaches for treating meth abuse among teen girls.

Results from the study, conducted by the UCLA Center for Behavioral and Addiction Medicine and the community-based substance abuse treatment program Behavioral Health Services Inc., are published in the April edition of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Advertisement

"The greater severity of methamphetamine problems in adolescent girls compared to boys, combined with results of studies in adults that also found women to be more susceptible to methamphetamine than men, suggests that the gender differences in methamphetamine addiction observed in adults may actually begin in adolescence," said the study's lead author, Dr. Keith Heinzerling, a health sciences assistant clinical professor of family medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

The clinical trial focused on use of the antidepressant bupropion for treating methamphetamine addiction. Nineteen adolescents nine boys and 10 girls with meth addiction who were receiving counseling at Behavioral Health Services were given either bupropion or placebo pills. The average age of participants was approximately 17.5 years.
Advertisement

The researchers found that the study subjects who received the antidepressant provided significantly fewer meth-free urine samples than did those who were given placebos, suggesting that bupropion was an ineffective treatment for addiction in this small sample.

Overall, boys in both groups provided more than twice as many meth-free urine drug tests during treatment as girls in both groups.

While the results did not support continued research into the use of bupropion for methamphetamine addiction, they did suggest the need for research to develop new interventions to improve the outcomes of treatment for addiction in adolescent girls, the researchers said.

Heinzerling noted the importance of collaborations such as the one between UCLA and Behavioral Health Services.

"It shows that partnerships between researchers and community organizations are critical to insuring that research is translated into improvements in the health of real people," he said.
Source: Eurekalert
Font : A-A+

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Readings

Latest Drug News

Can a Needle-Free Patch Transform Zika Protection?
Researchers create needle-free Zika vaccine patch, using HD-MAP tech, aiming to protect against fatal virus spread by mosquitoes.
Prolonging Market Exclusivity of Brand-name Insulin
Examining FDA and patent records, researchers found that insulin manufacturers prolong market exclusivity for brand-name products.
FDA Boosts Orphan Drug Designations for Myelofibrosis Treatments
The rise in FDA ODD awards indicates a collective endeavor to create new myelofibrosis medications devoid of mechanisms inducing anemia.
Anti-Rheumatic Drugs May Help Prevent Thyroid Disease
The most significant decrease in autoimmune thyroid disease risk was observed in rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving immunomodulatory drugs or 'biological DMARDs'.
Apotransferrin's Potential in Early Stroke Therapy Revealed
Human apotransferrin injected to mice models suffering from intracerebral hemorrhage was found to mitigate the serious effects of stroke.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Teen Girls Less Successful at Quitting Meth Drug During Treatment Than Boys: Study Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests