About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Study Finds Few Risks To Babies Born To Parents Who Were Childhood Cancer Survivors

by Aruna on October 5, 2009 at 10:16 AM
Font : A-A+

Study Finds Few Risks To Babies Born To Parents Who Were Childhood Cancer Survivors

People who have survived cancer as a child can now have a sigh of relief, for two new studies have found fewer risks of their childhood disease on their babies.

While it is believed that fertility can be compromised by cancer treatment, the studies led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center observed few risks to babies born to parents who underwent cancer treatment in childhood or adolescence.

Advertisement

The most significant finding was among women cancer survivors, who had a greater risk of giving birth to pre-term and low birth weight infants compared to the general population.

Among female cancer survivors, 15 percent of births were pre-term versus 10 percent among women who never had cancer.

However, babies born to female cancer survivors had no increased risk of birth defects or infant death, according to the paper that examined pregnancy outcomes.
Advertisement

The researchers found that babies fathered by male childhood cancer survivors had a borderline risk of low birth weight but no increased risk of pre-maturity, being small for gestational age, or having birth defects when compared to controls.

"The take home message overall is positive. If you had cancer as a younger person and you are able to have children then most likely your children will be fine. Most of the other side effects that people have the most concern about - birth defects and more serious maternal complications during pregnancy - we didn't find those things," said Dr. Eric Chow, corresponding author of the study.

He said pregnant women who had cancer in childhood should seek prenatal care early in their pregnancies and make sure their physicians and obstetricians know about their cancer history.

Even close monitoring may help prevent early births and underweight newborns.

For the studies, the researchers used data from cancer registries operated by The National Institutes of Health in four U.S. regions - Seattle, Detroit, Salt Lake City and Atlanta.

The studies have been published in the journal Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

Source: ANI
ARU
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Top 10 Vitamin B12 Foods for Vegetarians - Slideshow
Targeted Screening Program Beneficial for Prostate Cancer Screening
Are Menopause Symptoms Troubling You?: Try these Options
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Cancer and Homeopathy Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cancer Facts Cancer Tattoos A Body Art Common Lifestyle Habits that Cause Diseases Health Benefits of Dandelion Plant Brain Tumor in Children Childhood Cancer Neuroblastoma 

Most Popular on Medindia

Color Blindness Calculator Selfie Addiction Calculator Post-Nasal Drip Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Iron Intake Calculator Vent Forte (Theophylline) Find a Doctor Drug - Food Interactions Diaphragmatic Hernia

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use