About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Study Explains Why Brains Get Tired When Exercising

by Sheela Philomena on March 5, 2013 at 3:49 PM
Font : A-A+

 Study Explains Why Brains Get Tired When Exercising

A recent study has identified that a braking mechanism in the brain, which swings into effect can make us tired when exercising.

What may be occurring is what is referred to as 'central fatigue,' said researchers.

Advertisement

"Our discovery is helping to shed light on the paradox which has long been the subject of discussion by researchers," said Associate Professor Jean-Francois Perrier from the Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, who has spearheaded the new research.

"We have always known that the neurotransmitter serotonin is released when you exercise, and indeed, it helps us to keep going. However, the answer to what role the substance plays in relation to the fact that we also feel so exhausted we have to stop has been eluding us for years. We can now see it is actually a surplus of serotonin that triggers a braking mechanism in the brain. In other words, serotonin functions as an accelerator but also as a brake when the strain becomes excessive," said Jean-Francois Perrier.
Advertisement

He hopes that mapping the mechanism that prompts central fatigue will be useful in several ways.

Central fatigue is a phenomenon that has been known for about 80 years; it is a sort of tiredness, which, instead of affecting the muscles, hits the brain and nervous system.

By conducting scientific experiments, it is possible to observe and measure that the brain sends insufficient signals to the muscles to keep going, which in turn means that we are unable to keep performing. This makes the mechanism behind central fatigue an interesting area in the battle against doping, and it is for this reason that Anti Doping Danmark has also helped fund the group's research.

"In combating the use of doping, it is crucial to identify which methods athletes can use to prevent central fatigue and thereby continue to perform beyond what is naturally possible. And the best way of doing so is to understand the underlying mechanism," said Jean-Francois Perrier.

The brain communicates with our muscles using so-called motoneurons. In several diseases, motoneurons are hyperactive. This is true, for example, of people suffering from spasticity and cerebral palsy, who are unable to control their movements.

Jean-Francois Perrier therefore hopes that, in the long term, this new knowledge can also be used to help develop drugs against these symptoms and to find out more about the effects of antidepressants.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Menstrual Disorders
Coffee May Help You Fight Endometrial Cancer
Fermented Skin Care
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Tired All The Time Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) 

Recommended Reading
Tired All The Time
Tired All The Time (TATT) syndrome is not only about feeling of tired, however there are a host of ....
Top Health Tips to Overcome Tiredness
If you follow a healthy lifestyle and still feel tired, you should rule out all possible medical ......
Quiz on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Do you always feel tired despite all your tests coming normal? You could be suffering from chronic ....
Brain Depression - Animation
Interactive section of Medindia provides information about chemistry of Brain depression...
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, writte...
Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ)
Intelligence quotient (IQ) is a psychological measure of human intelligence. Regular physical and me...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
ASK A DOCTOR ONLINE
I have read and I do accept terms of use - Telemedicine

Advantage Medindia: FREE subscription for 'Personalised Health & Wellness website with consultation' (Value Rs.300/-)