About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Study Examines Blood Markers, Survival in ALS Patients

by Bidita Debnath on July 24, 2014 at 10:49 PM
Font : A-A+

 Study Examines Blood Markers, Survival in ALS Patients

Bottom Line: The blood biomarkers serum creatinine and albumin appear to be associated with survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and may help define prognosis in patients after they are diagnosed with the fatal neurodegenerative disorder commonly known as Lou Gehrig disease.

Author: Adriano Chiņ, M.D., of the Rita Levi Montalcini Department of Neuroscience, Torino, Italy, and colleagues.

Advertisement

Background: The median survival time of patients with ALS is 2 to 4 years from onset and 1 to 3 years from diagnosis. Therefore, there is a need to identify reliable biomarkers of ALS progression for clinical practice and pharmacological trials.

How the Study Was Conducted: The authors examined blood markers at ALS diagnosis in a population-based group of patients (discovery cohort, n=712) in Italy and then replicated the findings in another group of patients (validation cohort, n=122) from an ALS tertiary center. The blood markers examined included total leukocytes, glucose, cholesterol, albumin, creatinine and thyroid-stimulating hormones.
Advertisement

Results: Serum albumin and creatinine levels were related to ALS survival in both sexes. Creatinine reflected muscle waste and albumin was related to inflammation. Lower albumin and creatinine levels are related to worse clinical function at diagnosis. Discussion: "Both creatinine and albumin are reliable and easily detectable blood markers of the severity of motor dysfunction in ALS and could be used in defining patients' prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Longitudinal studies on the variations in serum albumin and creatinine levels and their relationships to clinical status will help determine whether and how these hematological factors vary during the progression of the disease." (JAMA Neurol Published online July 21, 2014. doi:10.1001/.jamaneurol.2014.1129. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: An author made a conflict of interest disclosure. This work was in part supported by a grant and the Joint Programme Neurodegenerative Disease Research from the Italian Ministry of Health and a grant from the European Community's Health Seventh Framework Programme. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

Latest Research News

 Regrowth of Nerve Cells Could Heal Certain Types of Blindness and Paralysis
Researchers found that treatments helping to repair nerve damage in neurons in a near-embryonic state might potentially restore sight and movement.
What Are the Effects of Smoking on Quality of Life?
Tobacco smoke contains toxic chemicals which damage lungs, weaken the immune system and cause tuberculosis.
 Brain Shape Controls Our Thoughts, Feelings, and Behaviour
Identifying an unappreciated relationship between brain shape and activity overturns the century-old paradigm emphasizing the importance of complex brain connectivity.
Eight Threats to Black Adult's Longevity
Decoding the eight factors affecting Black adults' life expectancy.
Beyond the Campus: Contrasting Realities Revealed!
Sobering truth about foot travel in the United States emerges from international statistics, highlighting the prevalence of walking on the Blacksburg campus.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Study Examines Blood Markers, Survival in ALS Patients Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests