Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Medindia
Advertisement

Structural Defects Occur Much Before Decline in Heart Function

by Savitha C Muppala on September 2, 2010 at 11:56 AM
 Structural Defects Occur Much Before Decline in Heart Function

Structural defects in heart muscle seems to occur even before decline of heart function, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

The structure is a highly organized network of grooves in heart muscle membrane called T-tubules. This network is essential for transmitting electrical signals to the cell's interior where they are translated into contractions that make the heart beat.

Advertisement

It was previously known that T-tubules become very disorganized during heart failure. The new study, published in the Aug. 20 issue of the journal Circulation Research, shows that this disorganization starts well before heart failure occurs during a stage known as compensated hypertrophy, when the heart muscle is enlarged but still able to pump a normal amount of blood around the body.

"Although heart function appears normal during compensated hypertrophy, we found that there already is structural damage," said Long-Sheng Song, M.D., senior author of this paper and UI assistant professor of internal medicine. "Our study suggests that things are going wrong very early in the process, and if we could prevent or slow this damage, we might be able to delay the onset of heart failure."
Advertisement

The researchers used a state-of-the-art imaging technique called laser scanning confocal microscope to visualize these structural changes in an animal model of heart failure. The study compared T-tubule structure and heart function at different stages of heart disease and found that the more disorganized the T-tubule network becomes, the worse the heart functions.

Moreover, the researchers found that T-tubule disorganization was also accompanied by a reduction in levels of a molecule called junctophilin-2, which is thought to be involved in formation of T-tubule networks. In cell experiments, loss of this molecule led to reduced T-tubule integrity.

Although the new findings are not ready to be applied in a clinical setting, understanding how T-tubule disruption occurs may lead to new ways to diagnose or treat heart failure.



Source: Eurekalert
Font : A-A+

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Readings

Latest Heart Disease News

Red Flags in Red Cells  Decoding Their Threat on Heart Health!
According to health experts, an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and blood clots is associated with higher hemoglobin levels.
Atherosclerosis in Young Adults Curbed by Early Risk Factor Management
Early cardiac evaluation reverses atherosclerosis caused by cardiac risk factors like high BP and high cholesterol in young adults.
Summer Wildfires and Winter Air Pollution Pose Varied Heart Health Risks
PM2.5 increases during winter inversions are associated with higher heart attack risk, stated study.
Genetic Testing Identifies High Cholesterol Risk, Preventing Heart Events
The study underscores the significance of broader genetic testing for familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic disorder that causes high bad cholesterol levels.
Increased Blood Transfusion Benefits Heart Attack Patients With Anemia
For patients experiencing both anemia and a heart attack, transfusion threshold trials play a crucial role in assisting physicians in making informed decisions.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Structural Defects Occur Much Before Decline in Heart Function Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests