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Stem-cell-based Strategy Boosts Immune System in Mice: Researchers

by Rukmani Krishna on May 18, 2013 at 11:42 PM
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 Stem-cell-based Strategy Boosts Immune System in Mice: Researchers

UC San Francisco researchers have created the first functioning human thymus tissue from embryonic stem cells in the laboratory raising hopes for cell-based therapies. The researchers showed that, in mice, the tissue can be used to foster the development of white blood cells the body needs to mount healthy immune responses and to prevent harmful autoimmune reactions.

The scientists who developed the thymus cells — which caused the proliferation and maturation of functioning immune cells when transplanted — said the achievement marks a significant step toward potential new treatments based on stem-cell and organ transplantation, as well as new therapies for type-1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, and for immunodeficiency diseases.

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Starting with human embryonic stem cells, UCSF researchers led by Mark Anderson, MD, PhD, an immunologist, and Matthias Hebrok, PhD, a stem-cell researcher and the director of the UCSF Diabetes Center, used a unique combination of growth factors to shape the developmental trajectory of the cells, and eventually hit upon a formula that yielded functional thymus tissue.

The result, reported in the May 16, 2013 online edition of the journal Cell Stem Cell, is functioning tissue that nurtures the growth and development of the white blood cells known as T cells. T cells are a central immune cell population that responds to specific disease pathogens and also prevents the immune system from attacking the body's own tissues.
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The thymus might be a bit obscure to the layperson — it's a small gland at the top of the chest beneath the breastbone — but it is in no way expendable, as individuals with defective thymus function succumb to infection early in life.

Given the invasive nature of cell therapy, which remains completely experimental, the first treatments using laboratory-derived thymus tissue would likely be studied in patients with fatal diseases for which there are no effective treatments, Anderson said. For example, one early treatment might be for the genetic disease DeGeorge syndrome, in which some newborns are born without a thymus gland and die in infancy.

Source: Eurekalert
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