About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Special UV Photos can Spot Skin Cancer Before It Kills

by Adeline Dorcas on June 6, 2019 at 12:32 PM
Font : A-A+

Special UV Photos can Spot Skin Cancer Before It Kills

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays may increase skin cancer risk. However, a new study highlights that special UV photographs are capable of revealing existing skin damage caused by UV light exposure, which is usually invisible to the naked eye.

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States. If you could visibly see signs of skin cancer on your body, would you be more likely to visit the doctor? A group of professors from BYU and the University of Utah asked that exact question as they looked for the most effective ways to influence people to screen themselves for cancer.

Advertisement


The team found that visual stimulation had a significant impact on those whom they studied, a group of more than 2,200 adults ages 18-89 from across the country. The results demonstrate that UV skin damage visuals can cause viewers to feel fear, which then made these individuals more likely to participate in positive sun-safe behaviors such as wearing sunscreen or protective clothing.

"Just talking about skin cancer, being inundated with facts and mortality rates, all of that is fear-inspiring language, but the images were so powerful that they moved people to intend to take action," said Kevin John, an assistant professor in BYU's School of Communications and study co-author.
Advertisement

The group tested a variety of methods including showing people facts, stock photos of other people in the sun, photos where moles have been removed, etc. In total, they used 60 different variations to figure out what method was the most effective.

In addition to sharing facts and figures, John and his colleagues were able to take special UV photos using a VISIA UV complexion analysis system to capture images of skin damage on faces of members from the research team. On the surface, many people may not see signs of skin cancer, but with the VISIA UV camera system, UV photographs are capable of revealing existing skin damage caused by UV light exposure which is normally invisible to the naked eye.

"The UV photos, and one particular image of a mole being removed, were the most effective in terms of influencing someone to change their behavior. This tells us these are the types of images we need to use to convince people to screen themselves for cancer. Over time, we hope this will cause mortality rates to drop," John said.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
World Hypertension Day 2022 - Measure Blood Pressure Accurately, Control It, Live Longer!
Drinking This Popular Beverage May Drop Dementia Risk
Worst Mistakes Parents Make When Talking to Kids
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Boils / Skin Abscess Skin Cancer Cancer and Homeopathy Ultra-Violet Radiation Cancer Facts Pityriasis rosea Cancer Tattoos A Body Art Pemphigus Hives 

Most Popular on Medindia

How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Sanatogen Color Blindness Calculator Drug Side Effects Calculator Indian Medical Journals Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Vent Forte (Theophylline) Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Selfie Addiction Calculator Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine)

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use