About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Some Kids are More Likely to Suffer Depression Long After Being Bullied

by Iswarya on July 2, 2019 at 3:27 PM
Font : A-A+

Some Kids are More Likely to Suffer Depression Long After Being Bullied

Young adults who were bullied as a child may have a greater risk of ongoing depression due to a mix of genetic factors and environmental factors, reveals a new study. The findings of the study are published in the journal JAMA Network Open.

Researchers wanted to find out what factors influenced depression in young adults between the ages of 10 and 24 and why some people responded differently to risk factors such as bullying, maternal postnatal depression, early childhood anxiety, and domestic violence.

Advertisement


Using detailed mood and feelings questionnaires and genetic information from 3,325 teenagers who are part of Bristol's Children of the 90s study, alongside evidence of these risk factors at nine points in time they found that childhood bullying was strongly associated with trajectories of depression that rise at an early age. Children who continued to show high depression into adulthood were also more likely to have genetic liability for depression and a mother with postnatal depression. However, Children who were bullied but did not have any genetic liability for depression showed much lower depressive symptoms as they become young adults.

University of Bristol Ph.D. student Alex Kwong commented: "Although we know that depression can strike first during the teenage years, we didn't know how risk factors influenced change over time. Thanks to the Children of the 90s study, we were able to examine at multiple time points the relationships between the strongest risk factors such as bullying and maternal depression, as well as factors such as genetic liability.
Advertisement

"It's important that we know if some children are more at risk of depression long after any childhood bullying has occurred. Our study found that young adults who were bullied as children were eight times more likely to experience depression that was limited to childhood. However, some children who were bullied showed greater patterns of depression that continued into adulthood, and this group of children also showed genetic liability and family risk.

"However, just because an individual has genetic liability to depression does not mean they are destined to go on and have depression. There are many complex pathways that we still don't fully understand and need to investigate further.

"The next steps should continue to look at both genetic and environmental risk factors to help untangle this complex relationship that would eventually help influence prevention and coping strategies for our health and education services."

Lecturer in Psychiatric Epidemiology at the University of Bristol Dr. Rebecca Pearson added:

"The results can help us to identify which groups of children are most likely to suffer ongoing symptoms of depression into adulthood and which children will recover across adolescence. For example, the results suggest that children with multiple risk factors (including family history and bullying) should be targeted for early intervention but that when risk factors such as bullying occur insolation, symptoms of depression may be less likely to persist"

Karen Black, Chief Executive Officer for Bristol's Off the Record, added: "At Off The Record we see a diverse mix of young people presenting with a range of needs, often depression and anxiety. Understanding some of the factors that influence this will further help us to shape services and our offer for young people. I would also hope that studies such as these will help change policy direction and spending so that we start to get upstream of the issues that we know affect mental health including education and family, prevention rather than cure ideally."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Ten Fruits for Diabetics
Natural Supplements Help Reverse Hair Loss during Menopause
Ways to Manage Stress during COVID-19 Pandemic
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Adolescence Depression Depression Height and Weight-Kids Stress Relief Through Alternative Medicine Andropause / Male Menopause Pregnancy and Complications Bereavement Holistic Management for Depression Tourette Syndrome Dealing with Menopause symptoms through lifestyle changes 

Recommended Reading
Bullying in Children - Tips For Teachers and Parents
Bullying is a harmful action (physical or psychological) carried out by a child against another. It ...
Bullying in School Linked to Lower Academic Achievements
The study shows how specific, long-term bullying is associated with children's school engagement ......
Bullying Affects the Brain
There may be physical structural differences in the brains of adolescents who are regularly ......
Bias-based Bullying Does More Harm
Victims of multiple bias-based bullying had the worst outcomes in three areas: fear of being ......
Andropause / Male Menopause
Andropause or male menopause causing low libido in a man is due to decreasing level of male hormones...
Bereavement
Bereavement refers to grief, pain and sadness following the loss of a loved one, especially during t...
Dealing with Menopause symptoms through lifestyle changes
You can deal with menopause symptoms such as hot flashes, weight gain and forgetfulness by making si...
Depression
Depression is one of the most common mental disorders affecting approximately 340 million people in ...
Holistic Management for Depression
Depression is a common disorder and many worldwide suffer from depression. Early recognition of symp...
Pregnancy and Complications
In-depth guide for expecting mothers to overcome health complications related to early or late pregn...
Tourette Syndrome
Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder wherein the affected person makes repetitive and s...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use