About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Skimming Through Nutrition Labels May Make You Eat Better

by Julia Samuel on April 20, 2017 at 5:35 PM
Font : A-A+

Skimming Through Nutrition Labels May Make You Eat Better

Nutrition label readers tend to eat differently than less-discerning diners in one key regard, according to research from a University of Illinois expert in food and nutrition policy and consumer food preferences and behaviors.

Although nutrition-label users and non-nutrition-label users eat roughly the same amount of food, the two groups diverge when it comes to the quality of the food they eat, says a new paper co-written by Brenna Ellison, a professor of agriculture and consumer economics at Illinois.

Advertisement


"Research has often concluded that people who use nutrition labels eat better. But we don't necessarily talk about what better means," Ellison said. "Is it eating less food, or is it eating better food? This study looks at people's plates and considers both what they selected to eat and what they actually ate in an effort to determine which difference" - volume or quality - "is occurring."

To examine the relationship between label use and food selection, servings and consumption, Ellison and co-author Mary J. Christoph of the University of Minnesota combined survey and photographic data of the lunch plates of college students at two different university dining halls.
Advertisement

Food selection, servings and consumption were assessed using digital photography, a method with strong reliability for validating portion sizes compared with weighing food and visual estimation.

"In terms of measuring and evaluating the plates, we had students who built their own plates because it was a self-serve dining environment," Ellison said.

"Diners were only eligible if they were just sitting down to eat. It couldn't be someone who was halfway through their meal, which would misrepresent what they were eating and skew the results."

Based on the meals assessed, the quantity of foods served and consumed were roughly similar between the two groups. There were, however, distinct differences in the types of foods plated and consumed within MyPlate food categories between those who tended to read nutrition labels and those who didn't, the researchers found.

The results indicate that a greater proportion of nutrition-label users selected more fruits, vegetables and beans, and fewer potatoes and refined grains, compared with non-label users. In addition, fewer label users selected fried foods and foods with added sugars, Ellison said.

"We find that it's more about the types of food rather than the quantity of the food," Ellison said. "The amount of food between label users and non-label users was roughly the same amount. It's the differences in quality that are more prevalent than the sheer amount of food selected."

Using digital photography also provided a more objective assessment of food selection, servings and consumption compared with self-reporting.

Participants were further surveyed on socio-demographic and behavioral variables such as gender, body mass index, exercise frequency and nutrition education to better assess the possible link between label use and food selection, servings and consumption, according to the paper.

Examining nutrition labels is often recommended by doctors and dietitians to improve food choices, but choice does not always translate to consumption. Furthermore, evidence on the effectiveness of labels is mixed, and few studies can identify how labels actually influence behavior, Ellison said.

"Previous research has focused on portion control for weight loss or weight management, generally eating less. But, more-recent research indicates this may not be the most effective message. By eating less, consumers may feel deprived, or even 'hangry,' which can make it difficult to sustain long-term dietary behaviors," she said.

Although the results show label users eat differently than non-users, the implications of the research suggest there may be a need for greater consumption of fruit, vegetables, beans, whole grains and low-fat dairy among both groups.

In addition to posting labels, Ellison said dining facilities may want to increase offerings of nutrient-dense foods (whole grains and vegetables, for example) or consider product reformulations that creatively incorporate these foods to encourage healthy eating behaviors.

But Ellison warned that the study's findings should still be cautiously interpreted, as the conclusions are based on only one meal.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
H1N1 Influenza Prevention in Children: What Parents Need to Know
Dietary Factors Responsible for Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) Production and Hair Loss
Test Your Knowledge About Chromosomes?
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
The Cabbage Diet Zone Diet The Macrobiotic Diet Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Magical Millets for Your Health Dietary Doís and Doníts of Ayurveda Nutrition IQ Health Benefits of Eating Asparagus Top Health Benefits of Peanut Butter and Easy Home Recipes 

Most Popular on Medindia

Post-Nasal Drip Daily Calorie Requirements Blood Pressure Calculator Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Drug - Food Interactions Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Accident and Trauma Care Drug Interaction Checker Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Hearing Loss Calculator
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Skimming Through Nutrition Labels May Make You Eat Better Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests