About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Scientists Identify Mice That Regenerate Cartilage

by Rajashri on August 2, 2008 at 4:12 PM
Font : A-A+

 Scientists Identify Mice That Regenerate Cartilage

A strain of mice that have the natural ability to repair damaged cartilage has been discovered by researchers at Oregon Health and Science University.

They believe that the mice strain they dubbed MRL/MpJ may one day prove helpful in improving treatments for human knee, shoulder, and hip injuries.

Advertisement

"We think there is something special about these mice. They have the ability to regenerate cartilage," said Dr. Jamie Fitzgerald, assistant professor of orthopedics and rehabilitation in the OHSU School of Medicine.

"Knee pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints that bring people to their doctor.

"Human cartilage injuries heal poorly and can lead to cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. This is an enormous clinical problem. It is estimated that one quarter of the adult population will have some kind of arthritis by 2020," Fitzgerald added.
Advertisement

The researcher revealed that the study was started with the initial grant coming from the National Football League Charities, as knee injuries are a significant issue for professional athletes.

"Cartilage injuries can be career-ending for football players," Fitzgerald said.

During the study, Fitzgerald and his colleagues Dr. Andrea Herzka and Cathleen Rich studied knee injuries in 150 mice.

The results of the study that were recently published in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage suggest that three months after the cartilage in their knees was damaged, male MRL mice had replaced a significant amount of the injured tissue with healthy cartilage.

Chris Little, director of the Raymond Purves Bone and Joint Research Laboratories in Sydney, Australia, and one of the scientists involved in the project, says that the finding is significant for human health.

"The research we have published is an early, but important step in unravelling the important pathways that will facilitate development of new treatments," says the researcher.

The researchers have revealed that their next step will be to try to understand why these mice are able to restore the cartilage in their knees.

"If we can identify what genes or proteins are necessary for cartilage to heal, we can work toward finding similar genes and proteins in humans," Herzka says.

An actual treatment, however, "is many years away", say the researchers.

Source: ANI
RAS/L
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Contraceptive Pills in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Curtail Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Mushroom May Help Cut Down the Odds of Developing Depression
How to Battle Boredom during COVID
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.


Recommended Reading
Achondroplasia
Achondroplasia is a rare genetic disorder of bone growth that causes short-limbed dwarfism. It ......
Stem Cell Therapies Could Reduce Liver Transplants
A stem cell research team will study how stem cells develop into liver cells, and how these can be ....
Stem Cells to the Rescue of Osteoarthritis Patients
Stem cells could help repair cartilage damaged by osteoarthritis, say UK scientists....

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use